Canada’s wealthiest people are paying a shrinking amount of the country’s total tax burden, according to an analysis of new StatsCan data.

The share of federal and provincial taxes paid by the richest one per cent of earners fell to 20.8 per cent in 2011, from 23.3 per cent in 2007, says an analysis from the Globe and Mail’s Economy Lab.

That’s not because the rich are getting poorer; StatsCan’s data on high-income earnings finds little change in recent years in the share of income taken by the wealthiest Canadians.

It’s another potential sign that Canada’s tax system is incrementally becoming more favourable to high-income earners, as well as to corporations.

For the first time ever, in 2014 more than half of the federal government’s revenue will come from personal income taxes, the result of aggressive tax cuts for corporations over the past decade and a half.

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  • Trois-Rivieres, Que. - $152,300

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Sherbrooke: $162,600

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • St. Catharines-Niagara: $164,400

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Windsor -- $172,200

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Thunder Bay -- $173,900

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Quebec City -- $175,500

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Saint John, N.B.: $177,300

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Sudbury: $182,400

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Winnipeg -- $183,200

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Oshawa: $186,400

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • London, Ont.: $189,000

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Halifax -- $190,500

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Victoria -- $196,000

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Montreal -- $205,100

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Regina -- $207,400

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Kitchener-Waterloo: $209,500

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Hamilton -- $215,800

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Ottawa-Gatineau -- $216,300

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Saskatoon -- $218,900

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Vancouver -- $224,800

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • St. John's -- $225,000

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Edmonton -- $250,000

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Toronto -- $275,600

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • Calgary -- $391,700

    Minimum income needed to be part of the city's top one per cent of earners. Source: StatsCan

  • ALSO ON HUFFPOST: Canada's Most, Least Equal Provinces

  • (MOST EQUAL) P.E.I.: 17.5%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: n/a Source: StatsCan

  • New Brunswick: 21.7%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 4.5% Source: StatsCan

  • Nova Scotia: 24.6%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 5.2% Source: StatsCan

  • Quebec: 25.9%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 7.5% Source: StatsCan

  • Manitoba: 26%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 6.3% Source: StatsCan

  • Newfoundland: 28%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 5.2% Source: StatsCan

  • Saskatchewan: 32.8%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 7.3% Source: StatsCan

  • British Columbia: 34.1%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 9.9% Source: StatsCan

  • Canada nationwide: 35%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 10.6% Source: StatsCan

  • Ontario: 38.2%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 12.1% Source: StatsCan

  • Alberta: 48.9%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 16.6% Source: StatsCan

  • The Territories: 49.7%

    Percentage of income going to the top 10 per cent of earners. Top one per cent's share: 4.8% Source: StatsCan Pictured: Iqaluit, Baffin Island, Nunavut

  • ALSO ON HUFFPOST: OECD COUNTRIES WITH THE WORST INCOME INEQUALITY

  • 10. Japan

    A poor Japanese man pushes a cart in downtown Tokyo on March 2, 2010. (YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)

  • 9. Greece

    A woman holds a cardboard reading in Greek 'I' m hungry' on March 17, 2011 in central Athens. (LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/GettyImages)

  • 8. Spain

    A man looks for food in garbage container on January 15, 2013 in Santa Cruz de Tenerife on the Spanish Canary Island of Tenerife. (DESIREE MARTIN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • 7. U.K.

    On the day that Britain officially enters a recession, a homeless man walks the streets on January 23, 2009 in Liverpool, United Kingdom. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

  • 6. Portugal

    Hunter Halder walks toward his bicycle loaded with food that he collect in restaurants on October 21, 2011 in Lisbon. Every night, Hunter Halder, a 60 years old american leaving in Portugal, mounts his bike and toured the restaurants where he gets the food he distributes to the poor of Lisbon, hit hard by the severe economic crisis in Portugal. (PATRICIA DE MELO MOREIRA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • 5. Israel

    Thousands of Israelis gather to protest against the cost of living in Israel, in Jerusalem Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)

  • 4. U.S.

    A man walks down the street collecting cans on October 20, 2011 in Reading, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

  • 3. Turkey

    Children play on the garbage heap in Hasankeyf a small poverty stricken town on the banks of the Tigris on April 10, 2010. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)

  • 2. Mexico

    A family inside their house made with carboard at the edge of a ravine in a poor zone of Mexico city , on July 24, 2012. (OMAR TORRES/AFP/GettyImages)

  • 1. Chile

    Photo: In this June 14, 2012 photo, a man leaves his home in a horse drawn cart to begin his work day of recycling trash in an area where families live in extreme poverty in the Puente Alto sector of Santiago, Chile. (AP Photo/Victor Ruiz Caballero)

But the shrinking share of taxes paid by the richest Canadians may have to do with the collapse in stock prices during the last recession, StatsCan analysts told the Globe, because wealthy people earn more of their income through investments than middle earners, and those investments took a beating in the last recession.

Some analysts argue the rich are still paying more than their fair share of taxes. While the top one per cent paid 20.8 per cent of taxes in 2011, they collected half that share of total income — about 10.6 per cent of all earnings.

A recent study from human resources firm MacDowall Associates said the CEOs at Canada’s 60 largest publicly-traded firms made 133 times the average industrial wage in Canada in 2010 — $6.2 million, compared to an average $46,600.

But the study found taxes paid by those CEOs were 316 times the taxes on the average earner, with the top-60 CEOs paying an average of $2.52 million in income taxes, compared to just under $8,000 for the average earner.

"Do Canadian executives pay their fair share in taxes? We believe the answer is a resounding 'yes' based on our research," the study concluded.

All the same, an ever-larger share of taxes in Canada is being paid by middle- and low-income earners. Personal income taxes next year will account for 50 per cent of the federal government’s total revenue, up from 30 per cent five decades ago, according to an analysis from economist Toby Sanger of the Canadian Union of Public Employees.

Opposition parties have been hammering the Harper government over "hidden" taxes that they say impact middle- and low-income Canadians in particular, such as hikes in EI premiums, which have been rising steadily, and tariff hikes in the government's latest budget, that the opposition says will raise prices for consumers.

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