As waters rose to levels that threatened to swallow vast swaths of southern Alberta this summer, it was the question that wasn't too far back in the minds of Albertans who were then living through the second major flood in eight years.

How does the flood that ravaged parts of Canmore, Calgary, Medicine Hat and that virtually swallowed up High River whole, compare to that other historic and very costly deluge, the one that besieged Winnipeg in 1997? Was what Albertans were experiencing in late June even as bad as the one that wreaked havoc on Alberta in 2005?

Now, an interactive graphic compiled by Alberta Construction Magazine compares the cost of the 2013 Alberta flood to other massive natural disasters, such as the Quebec/Ontario ice storms and the Red River flood of 1997.

When people rushed out of their Manitoba homes, and the Army rushed into the Red River basin, the flood that inundated Winnipeg was then considered the costliest natural disaster in Canadian history.

Click through the slideshow below for a breakdown of how the cost and damage of the Alberta flood compares to that event and Canada's other historic disasters.

Story continues below slideshow

Loading Slideshow...
  • 5. 1996 Saguenay Flood (Quebec)

    $1.5 billion.

  • More than 16,000 people were evacuated. The official death toll was seven deaths, but other sources (notably Canadian Geographic) cite 10. In the end, 488 homes were destroyed and 1,230 damaged. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saguenay_Flood" target="_blank">-Wikipedia</a>

  • 4. Slave Lake Wildfire 2011

    $1.8 billion.

  • The fire destroyed roughly one-third of Slave Lake; 374 properties were destroyed and 52 damaged in the town proper, and another 59 were destroyed and 32 damaged in the surrounding area.[21] 732 people were left homeless as a result. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_Slave_Lake_wildfire" target="_blank">-Wikipedia</a>

  • 3. 1998 Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick Ice Storms

    $3 billion.

  • More than 1,000 transmission towers collapsed in chain reactions under the weight of the ice, leaving more than four million people without electricity, most of them in southern Quebec, western New Brunswick and Eastern Ontario. At least twenty-five people died in the areas affected by the ice, primarily from hypothermia. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_ice_storm_of_1998#Impact" target="_blank">-Wikipedia</a>

  • 2. Red River Flood 1997

    $3.5 billion.

  • Approximately 28,000 people were evacuated throughout Manitoba. In Winnipeg alone, more than 9,000 city residents, representing 3,000 homes, were evacuated during the flood.

  • 1. Alberta Flood 2013

    $5 billion.

  • It resulted in 120,000 people being evacuated, four fatalities and 32 states of local emergency throughout southern Alberta.

  • NEXT ---> Alberta's biggest disasters

  • From mine explosions to wildfires, and from the worst landslide and tornado in Canadian history, these are the worst Alberta disasters of all time. <em>CLICK THROUGH THE SLIDE TO SEE ALL</em>.

  • The Pine Lake Tornado

    A victim service volunteer looks on as trailer owners console each other during their first visit to the Green Acres campground Wednesday July 19, 2000 in Pine Lake, Alta. (CP PHOTO/Adrian Wyld)

  • The Pine Lake Tornado

    The tornado was classified as an F3, when it descended on the shores of Pine Lake in central Alberrta on the evening of July 14, 2000. The twister killed 12 people and injured more than 100 others when it left a swath of destruction approximately 8oo metres wide and 1.5 km long through a campground and trailer park. It's estimated the tornado touched ground for nearly 40 minutes.

  • The Pine Lake Tornado

  • Hinton Train Collision

  • Hinton Train Collision

    It's one of the worst preventable losses of life in Alberta's history. Twenty-three people were killed and 71 injured when a CN Railway freight train collided head on with a Via Rail passenger train near Hinton, on the morning of Feb. 8, 1986. An investigation following the crash determined the CN train failed to observe control measures, jumped a switch and entered a section of single track that eventually brought the two trains into a fatal collision course.

  • Hinton Train Collision

    Ken Cuttle, at home in his Victoria apartment, Wednesday, Feb.1, 2006, is a survivor of the Hinton train disaster which killed 23 people 20 years ago.

  • The Slave Lake Wildfire

    A water bomber drops it's water on a fire, 160 km northeast of Edmonton, Alberta, on Sunday May 15, 2011. Over a thousand people were ordered to leave their homes on Sunday when strong winds fanned two separate wildfires that burned on either side of a northern Alberta town. THE CANADIAN PRESS\Ian Jackson

  • The Slave Lake Wildfire

    The Slave Lake Wildfire burned through the town of Slave Lake in northern Alberta but originated as a forest fire approximately 15 kilometres outside the town boundary on May 14, 2011. Although the town's entire population of 7,000 people had to be evacuated, the only casualty was a Montreal-based helicopter pilot, who crashed while battling the historic blaze.

  • The Slave Lake Wildfire

    Crews work to shut off gas and water in a burned-out neighbourhood in Slave Lake, Alta., on Wednesday, May 18, 2011. Almost all of Slave Lakes's 7,000 residents fled Sunday in the face of a forest fire that eventually destroyed about a third of the town.

  • The Slave Lake Wildfire

    The fire, which caused an estimated $700M in damage, making the wildfire the second costliest disaster in Canadian history, ravaged one third of the town, destroyed hundreds of homes, the town hall, library, radio station, a mall and churches.

  • Fire destroys 40 per cent of the town of Slave Lake — and forcing thousands of people to flee their homes.

  • The Slave Lake Wildfire

    The fire left 732 people homeless and was described by fire personnel as unprecedented in it's speed and destructive power. Including the town, the blaze charred 12,000 acres. An investigation concluded the cause for the fire was human activity.

  • The Slave Lake Wildfire

    The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge look at debris as they tour a fire-damaged area of Slave Lake, Alta., Wednesday, July 6, 2011. More than 400 homes and businesses — about one-third of the town — were reduced to ash and debris when a wind-whipped forest fire swept through in May.

  • Frank Slide 4-30-1903

    description 1 The town of en:Frank, Alberta | Frank, Alberta on April 30, 1903, one day after the en:Frank Slide | Frank Slide . | ...

  • Frank Slide

    A gigantic rock slide that buried a great portion of the town of Frank, in the province's southwest corner, is the worst natural disaster in Alberta history. It was in the dark early hours of April 29, 1903, when an entire side of the Rocky Mountain slope overwatching the mining town collapsed into the valley floor, taking with it the mine, homes and entire families.

  • Frank Slide from NE flank of Turtle Mountain

    Looking NE at the en:Frank Slide | Frank Slide Sun 24 Sep 2006 02:55:00 PM MDT. The slide crossed the en:Crowsnest River | Crowsnest River ...

  • Frank Slide

    In less than two minutes, 90 million tons of rock slid down the side of Turtle Mountain, crushing and burying the occupants of the town where they slept. It's still not known how many people perished in the slide, with estimates running between 70 and 90. Most of the dead, remain where they died.

  • Hillcrest Mine Explosion

  • Hillcrest Mine Explosion

    When the Hillcrest mine exploded on June 9, 1914, it took with it 189 workers. The coal mine explosion, which devastated the town of Hillcrest Mines in the southwest corner of the province, left 130 women widowed and approximately 400 children fatherless. It is, to this day, the worst mining disaster in Canadian history.

  • Hillcrest Mine Explosion

  • Edmonton Tornado

    EDMONTON - JULY 31, 1987 - FILE PHOTO OF EDMONTON'S TORNADO at approximately 3: 30pm.

  • Edmonton Tornado

    The most destructive tornado in Alberta history was an F4 twister that ripped through the eastern parts of Edmonton and neighbouring Strathcona County in the afternoon of July 31 1987. The tornado killed 27 people and injured more than 300 others, as it cut a swath of destruction nearly 40 kilometres long and one kilometre wide.

  • Edmonton Tornado

    Little remains of the Evergreen Trailer court after a tornado ripped through east Edmonton July 1987 and then devastated the trailer court located just northeast of Edmonton. (CP PHOTO/Larry MacDougal)

  • Edmonton Tornado

    The twister destroyed 300 homes and caused more than half-a-billion dollars (in 2013 dollars) in damage. Winds inside the tornado are believed to have reached 416 km/h.

  • Edmonton Tornado

    A mobile home with only part of it's kitchen left standing gives an idea of the destructive force of a tornado which ripped through parts of Edmonton, Aug. 1, 1987. The mobile in the background was overturned completely with it's wheels upward

  • The Bellevue Mine Explosion

  • The Bellevue Mine Explosion

    Despite several complaints and government orders to make the southwestern Alberta mine safer, nothing was done in earnest until the coal facility exploded on the evening of Dec. 9, 1910. But in the end, it wasn't the blast that claimed most of the lives lost in the event but the carbon monoxide that poisoned the men trapped below. Altogether, 31 men were killed inside the mine that day.

  • The Chinchaga River Fire

  • The Chinchaga River Fire

    The Chinchaga River fire didn't actually start in Alberta, but just on the other side of the border in northeastern B.C. However, by the time it started to spread northeastward and crossed the Alberta border in the summer of 1950, it was moving with purpose and speed. The fire didn't claim any lives but it burned an estimated 4.2 million acres and gave birth to "the Great Smoke Pall," which turned day into night as far away as Toronto. It was reported that, like in Toronto, streetlights in New York, Washington D.C., and as far south as Florida, had to be turned on midday due to the unusual darkness.

  • The Chinchaga River Fire

    It was reported that because Alberta seemed to think little of the fire at the time and didn't really advertize it, those affected by the haze - which travelled high in the atmosphere and projected next to no smoke smell at ground level - in eastern Canada and U.S. had no idea what was causing the darkness leading many to ponder apocalyptic causes. The fire burned for months before it finally extinguished itself in September. It produced the largest burned area ever recorded on the continent.

  • Drought And The Great Depression

  • Drought And The Great Depression

    <a href="http://www.telusplanet.net/dgarneau/alberta16.htm" target="_blank">The severe drought of 1934 started with an unnatural winter with no snow, and sharp cold, followed by extreme heat in the spring and summer that set the stage for catastrophe</a>. This was recorded as the hottest year of the 20 century in North America. Some farmers had suffered 3 consecutive crop failures. A grasshopper plague invaded one thousand, six hundred square miles. The stories of their numbers are awesome and by mid May the black blizzard extended from Drumheller to Medicine Hat. The unceasing winds this year swept away the topsoil. Then, on July 12, one hail storm extending from Carstairs to Stettler pounded all that remained into mush.

  • Drought And The Great Depression

    <a href="http://www.telusplanet.net/dgarneau/alberta16.htm" target="_blank">Thousands of turkeys, chickens, waterfowl and rabbits are battered to death. </a>The old timers said that the real dirty thirties had begun for this area. In the southern half of the prairies, forty thousand families and a half million head of livestock struggled for survival. The summer agricultural fairs had to be abandoned; there is nothing to exhibit. Before the end of the depression a half million farmers would leave the most severely affected areas.

  • Drought And The Great Depression

  • Calgary Hail Storm 2012

    Windows Smashed In At Dealerships @lisaostrikoff: Completely smashed out windows @ dealerships #hail #yyc #royaloak(Instagram)

  • Calgary Hail Storm 2012

    Calgary Hail Storm 2012 It probably won't make many history books, as no one had to be evacuated, no one died and the land was not permanently scarred. But the price tag associated with the summer hail storm of 2012 leaves its mark in the sheer cost of damage it cost. The hail that pummeled the city and surrounding area during the event dented cars, smashed windows, damaged roofs and punched through siding, to the tune of $552M, the costliest such storm in record. The damage caused by the golf ball-sized projectiles accounted for more than half of all insurance claims across the country last year.

  • NEXT ---> Alberta Flood 2013

  • A washed out foot bridge lies on the creek bed in Canmore, Alta. Friday, June 21, 2013.

  • Flood waters surround the hospital in Canmore, Alta. on Friday, June 21, 2013.

But where the work done by Alberta Construction Magazine really shines is when it compares this summer's flood to that other one-in-100-year flood less than 10 years ago - the 2005 Alberta flood.

The graphic compares the two events in a head-to-head comparison pitting costs, human toll, infrastructure damage, magnitude and sheer volume of water that Mother Nature unleashed on the same communities, eight years apart.

CLICK TO SEE THE COMPLETE GRAPHIC HERE.