The holidays have come and gone, and that means it's time to fulfill that New Year's resolution to shed those extra pounds.

What's that you say, the gym is too busy? And Christmas spending has tapped you dry? Sorry, Vancouver permits no excuses when it comes to living an active lifestyle. And it doesn't have to be expensive.

Here are some ideas for building a healthy body that won't hit you hard in the wallet:

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  • Practise Intervals

    It doesn't hurt to run, walk or bike long distances, but it can get tedious. Instead, try interval training: jog for a minute, then sprint for 30 seconds. If you're on a bike, choose an area with lots of hills like North or West Vancouver to get your heart beating faster. Exercising this way works wonders for burning fat.

  • Park Your Car Further Away

    Don't waste your time trying to find a space near the Whole Foods entrance. Instead, park your car some distance away, so that you have some ground to cover on the way back. Carrying those cloth bags full of quinoa and barley a little further won't hurt either.

  • Clean Your Home from Top to Bottom

    You're wasting precious energy sitting in traffic and raging at your fellow drivers. Why not give yourself a bit of exercise before you park yourself at your desk all day? Load your iPhone with classical music, put your favourite book on an iPad or Kindle, and suddenly a trip on the bus, SkyTrain or Canada Line can become a pleasant experience.

  • Leave Your Car and Take Transit

    You're wasting precious energy sitting in traffic and raging at your fellow drivers. Why not give yourself a bit of exercise before you park yourself at your desk all day? Load your iPhone with classical music, put your favourite book on an iPad or Kindle, and suddenly a trip on the bus, SkyTrain or Canada Line can become a pleasant experience.

  • Take the Stairs

    We're not saying you should walk up the 15 storeys to your office; that's just cruel. But sometimes there's a choice between a ramp, an elevator or a stairway, and it doesn't always hurt to try the path of most resistance. Running up the stairs is also a great test of your cardiovascular fitness. If you don't wheeze, it's a breeze!

  • Bike to Work

    The infrastructure is there, so why not give it a try? There are plenty of routes to bike to work in Vancouver, be it 10th Avenue or the Hornby bike lane. Just be sure to wear your Gore-Tex to stay dry in the winter months.

  • Run the Seawall

    It's a simple, yet breathtaking route, and it's located right inside the city. The concrete path around Stanley Park offers excellent terrain for beginning runners and a great place to train for that half-marathon you promised to run this year.

  • Parkour

    The freerunning art made famous by the film "District B13" is seeing a revival in Vancouver as the Parks Board looks to establish an <a href="http://www.news1130.com/2013/11/26/vancouver-park-board-considers-setting-up-parkour-facilities/" target="_hplink">outdoor facility</a> for practitioners. But you don't have to wait around for that to try this exciting sport in which urban acrobats bound over structures such as railings, stairs and skate parks. A word of warning: the practice can be dangerous, so we recommend a class or two. <a href="http://www.originsparkour.com/" target="_blank">Origins Parkour and Athletic Facility</a> is one place you can take them.

  • Free Yoga

    There's so much enlightenment to be had in Vancouver, teachers are practically giving it away! Lululemon has <a href="http://www.lululemon.com/giftofyoga" target="_blank">complimentary yoga</a> classes at its stores, while YYoga offers a free first class for beginners. <a href="http://www.radhavancouver.org/" target="_blank">Radha Yoga Vancouver</a>, meanwhile, has a pay-as-you-can option for all of its classes.

  • Take a Hike

    Take a weekly sojourn into the wilderness. It's just a short drive out to the North Shore mountains where you'll find a network of great hiking trails that put you face-to-face with nature. Feel the mist drift off the trees and soak in the forest air. It's a workout that can fulfill both your physical and spiritual needs.

  • NEXT: <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/03/24/best-places-to-run-vancouver-running-routes_n_2929685.html" target="_blank">Best Places to Run in Vancouver</a>

  • Seawall

    Few places in the world are better for running than the Stanley Park Seawall. It's a breathtaking, 22-kilometre concrete path shared equally by runners, cyclists and rollerbladers (yes, they still exist here). It takes you around the Stanley Park point, along Burrard Inlet, under the Lions Gate Bridge and into False Creek, allowing you to feel the winds coming in off the Pacific Ocean.

  • Stanley Park Trails

    Step off the Seawall and you'll find an infinite number of natural trails throughout Stanley Park, a forested oasis at the edge of downtown Vancouver. Therein you'll find totem poles, lookout points, waterparks and even the Vancouver Aquarium. Because nothing will bring release the endorphins at the end of a long run like watching penguins.

  • Steveston Dyke

    The Steveston Dyke stretches from the cute little fishing village at Richmond's westernmost point, then wends out a fair distance along the Fraser River, past the airport and the Richmond Olympic Oval. You can race the boats as they sail by or watch planes come in.

  • False Creek Loop

    The False Creek Loop isn't formally called that, per se, but you have to call it something to differentiate it from the Seawall. Basically, there's a long path surrounding False Creek that begins around English Bay, runs past the Plaza of Nations, Science World, the Olympic Village and continues on into Granville Island. It's a lovely path that gives you a quick tour of the condo buildings that help earn Vancouver the nickname, "City of Glass."

  • Burnaby Central Park Trails

    Burnaby Central Park is a 90-hectare urban park that provides a respite from a long commute into the city or hectic Metrotown nearby. There's a ton of trails to choose from throughout the park, making it a perfect place to run in the heart of a prominent Vancouver suburb.

  • Jericho Beach

    Jericho Beach is connected to surrounding beaches by a long path that begins in Kitsilano and heads about as far as UBC. Nearly every running route in Vancouver offers unique views, and this one gives you a panorama of the North Shore mountains and a look out west into the Pacific Ocean. Plus, there are plenty of beaches to rest upon.

  • Pacific Spirit Park, UBC

    Pacific Spirit Park at UBC contains a network of trails that are ideal for running, hiking or cycling. For an extra challenge you can try running up and down the steps that take you to the beaches that surround the park. Oh, and one thing about those beaches: they're clothing optional.

  • Trout Lake

    Trout Lake is a lovely little natural respite in the heart of East Vancouver. In the summer it functions as a great venue for lantern festivals, and you can skate on the lake when it's cold enough in winter. But year-round it's got a great loop trail -- not very long or physically demanding, but good for a quick morning jog before you start your day.

  • Iona Beach Jetty

    "The jetty" reaches out about five kilometres from Iona Beach in Richmond. It's a long, flat path that has appealed equally to runners and cyclists. It's not the longest path, and hardly the most physically challenging, but when you reach its outermost point, there's only you and the ocean.

  • Burrard Bridge

    The Burrard Bridge is like a gateway. On one side you have the affluent houses and shops of Kitsilano, on the other the bustling life of Vancouver's downtown. You'll get to see people living, working and playing, all in one route.

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  • Stanley Park Seawall

    Maybe not the toughest bike ride in the world, but it's certainly among the prettiest. The Stanley Park seawall is a simple, leisurely ride that gives you a panoramic view of Vancouver's most beautiful scenery. Begin your ride at Lost Lagoon, just off Georgia Street, then enjoy a paved path that takes you past the Stanley Park totem poles, under the Lions Gate Bridge and finally to English Bay. There the path continues around False Creek up to Granville Island.

  • Pacific Spirit Park Trails, UBC

    Go in, get lost. That's the best way to enjoy the extensive network of hiking and biking trails at UBC's Pacific Spirit Park. The trails vary in difficulty but all of them take you into an urban forest that can make you feel as though you're thousands of kilometres away from the city.

  • UBC Loop

    UBC rests alone on a peninsula, just outside the city boundary. It's one of the most beautiful campuses in Canada, unique for its natural setting that allows ample opportunity for clear thinking. The Loop begins roughly around 10th and Blanca, though that's not the only place you have to start. Head south on Blanca, then turn right on to the UBC highway and keep on the shoulder to stay safe. Along the way you'll see sporadic glimpses of the ocean, Thunderbird Stadium, student residences, and even the president's majestic house.

  • Pipeline, Mt. Fromme, North Vancouver

    Only experienced bikers need apply. <a href="http://www.trailpeak.com/trail-Mt-Fromme-Pipeline-near-North-Vancouver-BC-4" target="_hplink">Pipeline is a difficult trail that forces extreme cyclists to climb over berms, ladders and natural single-track</a> for about two kilometres, says TrailPeak.com. It says something about this trail that it's one of the easier ones on the North Shore. Wear plenty of padding on this trail, there are plenty of opportunities to hurt yourself.

  • Steveston

    Park your car at No. 5 Road and Dyke Road in Richmond and then <a href="http://www.bcliving.ca/entertainment/bike-riders-rejoice-the-top-spots-to-cycle-in-metro-vancouver#Vancouver-Bike-Steveston" target="_hplink">just start riding one of the best trails in the region</a> as recommended by BC Living. This path takes you through marshlands, a slough, a heritage shipyard and finally a charming little fishing village with some of the best fish 'n' chips that B.C. has to offer. Carry on past the village and you'll hit the Steveston Dyke, which wends its way alongside the Fraser River until you get to central Richmond.

  • Burnaby Mountain Trail System

    Burnaby Mountain hosts an extensive network of trails that vary in difficulty. Nestled for the most part on the mountain's east side, they take you along North Road close to the city's boundary with Coquitlam, says the Vancouver Trails website. The Dead Moped Trail is a technical path that forces cyclists to ride skinnies, ramps and logs, while Mel's and Nicole's Loop 1 gives you a softer ride along some natural obstacles.

  • Traboulay PoCo Trail

    The <a href="http://www.portcoquitlam.ca/Page444.aspx" target="_hplink">Traboulay PoCo Trail</a> is a 25-kilometre network of trails that takes users through a natural and urban environment, says the City of Port Coquitlam website. The trail begins in Port Coquitlam's downtown area before taking users into the Colony Farm, a pristine area with over 150 bird species. Then it takes you along the Pitt and Coquitlam Rivers before ushering riders back to the community centre.

  • Valley Trail, Whistler

    Whistler isn't just a playground for extreme winter athletes; it's also a destination for cyclists who want to take advantage of some rough natural terrain. The Valley Trail is good training for people who aren't used to the lumps and bumps. It's 40 kilometres of paved trail that begins at the south end of town, taking cyclists through every Whistler neighbourhood, the village and beyond. It's a great way to get a feel for the sheer size of the town.

  • Comfortably Numb, Whistler

    This expert trail doesn't just get its name because its designer is a Pink Floyd fan. Comfortably Numb is a 24-kilometre trek that truly gives Whistler its reputation as a biking destination. It begins at the base of Wedge Mountain and takes you across treacherous terrain with bridges, ramps and single track, with plenty of bumps along the way.

  • Pemberton Meadows Road, Pemberton

    Venturing beyond Whistler, one of the prettiest rides you'll find is the the Pemberton Meadows Road, which traverses some of the province's most pristine agricultural land. It isn't strictly a bike trail, more a ride along the shoulder of a quiet road with valleys and hills rolling all around you. Save a trip for Aug. 18, and you could take part in the <a href="http://www.slowfoodcyclesunday.com/" target="_hplink">Slow Food Cycle</a>, when property owners open up their farms for visitors to sample the fruit of the land.

  • NEXT: <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/08/04/things-to-do-in-bc-extreme-sports_n_3583684.html" target="_blank">Most Extreme Sports You Can Play In B.C.</a>

  • BASE Jumping

    This gallery shows pictures and videos of the most extreme things you can do in B.C. Here, daredevil Shane McConkey BASE jumps off the Peak 2 Peak Gondola in Whistler.

  • BASE Jumping

  • BASE Jumping

  • BASE Jumping

  • BASE Jumping

  • Hang Gliding

  • Para Gliding

  • Para Gliding

  • Hang Gliding

  • Hang Gliding

  • Snowmobiling

  • Snowmobiling/BASE Jump

  • Snowmobiling

  • Snowmobiling

  • Snowmobiling

  • Skydiving

  • Skydiving

  • Skydiving

Practise Intervals
It doesn't hurt to run, walk or bike long distances, but it can get tedious. Instead, try interval training: jog for a minute, then sprint for 30 seconds. If you're on a bike, choose an area with lots of hills like North or West Vancouver to make your heart beat faster. Exercising this way works wonders for burning fat.

Park Your Car Further Away
Don't waste your time trying to find a space near the Whole Foods entrance. Instead, park your car some distance away, so that you have some ground to cover on the way back. Carrying those cloth bags full of quinoa and barley a little further won't hurt either.

Clean Your House From Top to Bottom
There's a reason why people resist cleaning as much as they avoid going to the gym: it's a workout! Vacuum vigorously, scrub in between your bathroom tiles, and clear every surface of dust—we're talking counters, dressers, baseboards and doorways here. You'll burn plenty of calories in a short time, and you'll be left with a spotless home.

Leave Your Car and Take Transit
You're wasting precious energy sitting in traffic and raging at your fellow drivers. Why not give yourself a bit of exercise before you park yourself at your desk all day? Load your iPhone with classical music, put your favourite book on an iPad or Kindle, and suddenly a trip on the bus, SkyTrain or Canada Line can become a pleasant experience.

Take the Stairs
We're not saying you should walk up the 15 stories to your office every day; that's just being cruel to your knees. But anytime there's a choice between a ramp, an escalator or the stairs, try to make it up on your own two feet. Besides, stairs provide a great barometer for your cardiovascular fitness. If you don't wheeze, it's a breeze!

Bike to Work
The infrastructure is there, so why not give it a try? There are plenty of routes to bike to work in Vancouver, be it 10th Avenue or the Hornby bike lane. The city's winter seasons are mild enough to permit cycling in the colder months, so that's one excuse out of the way.

Run the Seawall
It's a simple, yet breathtaking route, and it's located right inside the city. The concrete path around Stanley Park offers perfect terrain for beginning runners, making it a great place to train for that half-marathon you promised to run this year.

Parkour
The internet sensation of 2004 is seeing a revival in Vancouver as the Parks Board looks to establish an outdoor facility. But you don't have to wait around to try this exciting art, in which practitioners leap and bound over urban structures in an effort to arrive at a destination as efficiently (and stylishly) as possible. A word of warning: the practice can be dangerous, so we recommend a class or two. Origins Parkour and Athletic Facility is one place you can find them.

Free Yoga
There's so much enlightenment to be had in Vancouver, teachers are practically giving it away! Lululemon has complimentary yoga classes at its stores, while YYoga offers a free first class for beginners. Radha Yoga Vancouver, meanwhile, offers a pay-as-you-can option for all of its classes.

Take a Hike
Make a weekly sojourn into the wilderness. Take a short drive out to the North Shore mountains where there's a network of great hiking trails that put you face-to-face with nature. Feel the mist drift off the trees and soak in the forest air. It's a workout that can fulfill both your physical and spiritual needs.

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