After last week's shocking statement and photos from Sum 41's Deryck Whibley detailing his brush with death due to years of "hard boozing," many friends and fans sent well wishes to the alcoholic pop-punk singer/guitarist in his road to recovery, including his ex-wife Avril Lavigne.

But as much of a surprise as it may have been when Whibley posted his "Rock Bottom" message last Saturday, in which he says drinking caused his liver and kidneys to collapse, Deryck's health issues were a long time coming.

Sum 41 roadie Brian Keith Diaz posted his own lengthy blog entry on his site which revealed a musician who was not in the best of shape back as far back the fall of 2010.

The post, simply entitled "Deryck," stated Diaz received a call to work as Sum 41's guitar tech in October 2010 for the start of their European tour. "My first calls with their management team warned me, 'Be prepared for a lot of shenanigans. I suggest you watch the videos they post online. They like to party. A lot. Just be prepared. They party. A lot,'" Diaz wrote. "After being in a band for almost 15 years they still worked hard and had thousands upon thousands of fans the world over. Sum 41 made their career by being on the road constantly, and that same work ethic would eventually unravel them a bit when coupled with all the partying."

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  • Signs of Alcoholism

  • Abuse: Not Meeting Responsibilities

    <i>Abuse, the regular use of a substance that leads to serious psychological and/or physical disability, is shown by one or more of these symptoms during the same year:</i> Repeated substance use to the point of not being able to meet responsibilities -- not performing well at work, being suspended from school, being repeatedly late or absent from required duties, or neglecting household tasks.

  • Abuse: Involving Risk

    <i>Abuse, the regular use of a substance that leads to serious psychological and/or physical disability, is shown by one or more of these symptoms during the same year:</i> Repeated substance use when there is risk involved, like operating equipment or driving a car while under the influence.

  • Abuse: Difficulties With The Law

    <i>Abuse, the regular use of a substance that leads to serious psychological and/or physical disability, is shown by one or more of these symptoms during the same year:</i> Repeated difficulties with the law related to substance use -- being arrested for physical aggression or drunk driving, for instance.

  • Abuse: Personal Or Social Difficulties

    <i>Abuse, the regular use of a substance that leads to serious psychological and/or physical disability, is shown by one or more of these symptoms during the same year:</i> Insisting on using the substance regardless of continued or repeated personal or social difficulties because of it, verbal or physical aggression with a loved one, or frequent arguments about the substance use.

  • Dependence: Needing Great Amounts

    <i>Symptoms of alcohol dependence, a physical need to drink, are identified as three or more of the following within the same year:</i> Needing greater amounts of alcohol to satisfy cravings.

  • Dependence: An Inability To Reduce Use

    <i>Symptoms of alcohol dependence, a physical need to drink, are identified as three or more of the following within the same year:</i> Using the substance longer than planned or more frequently and in greater amounts. An inability to reduce use, despite a sincere wish to do so.

  • Dependence: Going Through Withdrawal

    <i>Symptoms of alcohol dependence, a physical need to drink, are identified as three or more of the following within the same year:</i> Going through withdrawal when not using alcohol, with symptoms such as tremors, restlessness, and agitation.

  • Dependence: Avoiding Withdrawal

    <i>Symptoms of alcohol dependence, a physical need to drink, are identified as three or more of the following within the same year:</i> Taking a substance or a similar one to avoid the effects of withdrawal.

  • Dependence: Spending Time On Alcohol

    <i>Symptoms of alcohol dependence, a physical need to drink, are identified as three or more of the following within the same year:</i> Spending a significant amount of time trying to acquire the substance. Spending less time at work or on other activities because of substance use; a person may completely abandon previously enjoyable activities.

  • Dependence: Drinking In The Face Of Difficulty

    <i>Symptoms of alcohol dependence, a physical need to drink, are identified as three or more of the following within the same year:</i> Continuing to drink despite being aware that alcohol is causing psychological or physical difficulties.

  • Addiction: Saying Inappropriate Things

    <i>Stephen Gilman, MD, an addiction specialist in New York City, helps determine the severity of alcohol addiction by asking the following questions:</i> Does he/she frequently say inappropriate things?

  • Addiction: Slurred Speech

    <i>Stephen Gilman, MD, an addiction specialist in New York City, helps determine the severity of alcohol addiction by asking the following questions:</i> Does his/her speech slurred?

  • Addiction: Missing Work

    <i>Stephen Gilman, MD, an addiction specialist in New York City, helps determine the severity of alcohol addiction by asking the following questions:</i> Does he/she miss work?

  • Addiction: Off Balance

    <i>Stephen Gilman, MD, an addiction specialist in New York City, helps determine the severity of alcohol addiction by asking the following questions:</i> Is his/her balance off when they walk?

  • Addiction: Trouble With The Law

    <i>Stephen Gilman, MD, an addiction specialist in New York City, helps determine the severity of alcohol addiction by asking the following questions:</i> Has he/she gotten in trouble with the law, for example, with drinking and driving?

  • Addiction: Health Problems

    <i>Stephen Gilman, MD, an addiction specialist in New York City, helps determine the severity of alcohol addiction by asking the following questions:</i> Is he having health issues related to alcohol addiction, such as heartburn, liver problems, high blood pressure, or insomnia?

  • Question To Ask: Should I Cut Down?

    <i>Take the CAGE questionnaire -- if the answer to two or more of the four CAGE questions is yes, it is likely you have a problem.</i> C stands for cut-down: Do you ever feel that you should cut down on your drinking?

  • Question To Ask: People Getting Annoyed?

    <i>Take the CAGE questionnaire -- if the answer to two or more of the four CAGE questions is yes, it is likely you have a problem.</i> A stands for annoyed: Have people annoyed you by criticizing your drinking?

  • Question To Ask: Ever Felt Guilty?

    <i>Take the CAGE questionnaire -- if the answer to two or more of the four CAGE questions is yes, it is likely you have a problem.</i> G stands for guilty: Have you ever felt guilty about your drinking?

  • Question To Ask: Drinking To 'Recover'?

    <i>Take the CAGE questionnaire -- if the answer to two or more of the four CAGE questions is yes, it is likely you have a problem.</i> E stands for eye-opener: Have you ever had to drink as soon as you wake up to steady your nerves or get over a hangover?

Diaz, who admitted he "spent a lot of that time shitfaced" himself, said it "wasn't uncommon to go weeks at a time drinking until we blacked out with out a break. "The party animal in me loved it but it had already started to take a toll on my body after several months," Diaz wrote. "I couldn't believe how far Deryck could go, though. I couldn't get myself to walk from the bus to the venue some days, and here this guy was playing shows every single night for an hour or more, sweating, running like a maniac, and killing a bottle of whiskey. It was insanity."

Diaz also says by the time he met Whibley in 2010 for the tour, the musician was "a functioning alcoholic" but Diaz saw it as somebody who worked hard and played hard. Diaz also said Whibley attempted to go sober at the start of the Japanese tour but "passed out on stage in Sapporo several songs into the set."

Whibley contracted pneumonia which also aborted an Australian tour with the musician ending up in a Sydney hospital. After trashing a hotel room hallway in Spain which caused "a few hundred Euros in damage," Diaz realized something had changed. "As much as I love the guy, I started to realize that this was incredibly destructive," Diaz wrote. "It had become the opposite of fun, regardless of what face everyone put on for the public."

The roadie also revealed Whibley contacted him two days before going public with his ailment. "As you can imagine I was in horrible shock hearing what had just happened to him," Diaz said. "He told me pretty much the same thing he eventually went on to tell the world. I got off the phone and cried. I was imagining my friend Deryck completely hitting rock bottom alone and it scared the shit out of me."

Diaz closed by saying he hates seeing Whibley go through this ordeal and that he's "going to remembered, at least for the time being, as a cautionary tale rather than the talented, good person that he is." However, he was glad Whibley is still alive.

"I wish Deryck well and hope this is the beginning of something new and better in his life."

Here are some other people who tweeted their get well wishes to Whibley:


Ben Mulroney
Thoughts go out to . Hoping his recovery is steady and complete.


Kerrang! Magazine
Sum 41's Deryck Whibley was recently hospitalised. Kerrang! wish him a speedy recovery.


MUCH
Best wishes to our friend Deryck from on his recovery:


Library Voices
I didn't know this guys name so it took forever to find this link. Get well soon little Sum 41 troll dude.


Sum 41 Canadian Fans
Deryck has the willpower to move forward & maintain a positive, healthier lifestyle to only better his future. RT if you believe!


Eric Silverman
. has gotten me through tough times in my life. Wishing the best to Deryck Whibley in his recovery from alcoholism.

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  • Brad Pitt

    "For a long time I thought I did too much damage -- drug damage. I was a bit of a drifter. A guy who felt he grew up in something of a vacuum and wanted to see things, wanted to be inspired ... I spent years f--king off. But then I got burnt out and felt that I was wasting my opportunity." [Esquire, 2013]

  • Joel Madden

    “Without cigarettes, I would be doing heroin, probably, on a daily basis.” [Blender, 2007]

  • Shawn Pyfrom

    "I am an alcoholic and a drug addict ... I'm relatively new to being sober, considering the scope of time that I’ve been an addict, but within that scope, this is also the longest I’ve been sober; since iI began using." [Tumblr, 2014]

  • Eminem

    “The things I was putting in my body, my tolerance got so high. I got to the point where I couldn’t even count how many pills I was taking... I had overdosed in 2007, like right around Christmas in 2007… Pretty much almost died... I scared myself, like, ‘Yo! I need to, I need help. Like I can’t beat this on my own. I think that was my biggest problem… I mean, I’m sure that anybody with addiction—the biggest problem is admitting that you have a problem. Nobody wants to admit that they’re not in control of something.” [Access Hollywood, 2010]

  • Robert Downey Jr.

    "All those years of snorting coke, and then I accidentally get involved in heroin after smoking crack for the first time. It finally tied my shoelaces together... Smoking dope and smoking coke, you are rendered defenseless. The only way out of that hopeless state is intervention." [Rolling Stone, 2010]

  • Anthony Kiedis

    "I spent most of my life looking for the quick fix and the deep kick. I shot drugs under freeway off-ramps with Mexican gangbangers and in thousand-dollar-a-day hotel suites. Now I sip vitamin-infused water and seek out wild, as opposed to farm-raised, salmon." ["Scar Tissue," published 2005]

  • Drew Barrymore

    "When I was 10 ½, I was sitting in a room with a group of young adults who were smoking pot. I wanted to try some, and they said, 'Sure. Isn't it cute, a little girl getting stoned?' Eventually that got boring, and my addict mind told me, 'Well, if smoking pot is cute, it'll also be cute to get the heavier stuff like cocaine.' It was gradual. What I did kept getting worse and worse, and I didn't care what anybody else thought." [People, 1989]

  • Nicole Richie

    "I kind of took matters into my own hands and was creating drama in a very dangerous way. I think I was just bored, and I had seen everything. Especially when you're young, you just want more. ... At 18 I had just been doing a lot of cocaine." [People, 2007]

  • Elton John

    "I was consumed by cocaine, booze and who knows what else. I apparently never got the memo that the Me generation had ended." ["Love Is the Cure: On Life, Loss and the End of AIDS," published 2012]

  • Dennis Quaid

    “Cocaine was even in the budgets of movies, thinly disguised. It was petty cash, you know? It was supplied, basically, on movie sets because everyone was doing it. People would make deals. Instead of having a cocktail, you’d have a line." [Newsweek, 2011]

  • Fergie

    “I got into a scene. I started going out and taking ecstasy. From ecstasy, it went to crystal meth. With any drugs, everything is great at the beginning, and then slowly your life starts to spiral down. [I was] 90 pounds at one point.” ["Oprah's Next Chapter," 2012]

  • Aaron Sorkin

    "I had what they call a 'high bottom, my life didn't fall apart before I got into rehab. I didn't lose my job or run over a kid or injure anyone when I was high. But the hardest thing I do every day is not take cocaine. You don't get cured of addiction -- you're just in remission." [W Magazine, 2010]

  • Maureen McCormick

    "I hit rock bottom when I was doing “The Brady Brides.” I was supposed to be at the studio, screen testing to pick the guy that would play my husband. At this time, I had been up for three days doing coke and was playing solitaire in my closet. My agent had to go to the sixth floor, climb into my place, tear off my clothes and get me in the shower. He said, “You have to get to Paramount right now, and you have a problem.” I couldn’t hide anymore. Everyone knew -- the producers knew, everyone at Paramount knew, the guys testing to play my husband knew. It was the first time I had to face that I really had a problem." ["Today," 2008]

  • Paula Abdul

    "Withdrawal -- it’s the worst thing. I was freezing cold, then sweating hot, then chattering and in so much pain. It was excruciating. At my very core, I did not like existing the way I had been.” [Us Weekly, 2010]

  • Matthew Perry

    "I was so hooked on opiates [at that point] that I couldn't even leave my bedroom." [Press Conference, 2013]

  • Angelina Jolie

    "I went through heavy, darker times and I survived them. I didn't die young, so I'm very lucky. There are other artists and people who didn't survive certain things ... I think people can imagine that I did the most dangerous and I did the worst-and for many reasons I shouldn't be here." ["60 Minutes," 2011]

  • Wendy Williams

    "It's been almost 15 years since I smoked last from a crack pipe. It's been almost 15 years since I waited on Jerome Avenue in the Bronx for my drugs." ["Wendy Williams Show," 2012]

  • Kirstie Alley

    "There was about a year’s span that I did cocaine that I was doing it -- you could say -- more occasionally, on the weekend. Then my weekend became a three-day weekend, then it became four, then it became five. I would do so much at a time that I would snort the coke and then I would sit there, I would take my pulse [thinking]: ‘I’m dying, I’m dying, I’m dying.’" ["Howard Stern," 2013]

  • Steven Tyler

    "I lost everything. It's serious. It's serious when you lose your kids, your children, your wife, your band, your job and you'll never understand why because you're an addict. You can't figure that out." ["Dr. Oz," 2013]

  • Demi Lovato

    “People don’t take it as seriously as it really is, it’s a mental illness and it’s a disease …There’s no pill that’s gonna change it …People need to have compassion for it …Being a former addict looking at it as I had a choice, because at some point in my disease I didn’t, I physically and emotionally couldn’t live without it, that was my medicine to my pain.” ["Extra," 2014]