Omega-3 Benefits: Healthy Reasons To Eat More Fish

Posted: Updated:
FISH
Fact: shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, pollock and catfish are your best low mercury bets | eskymaks via Getty Images
Print

You know fish is good for you, but you might not be familiar with the specifics, so let's go over them. It's high in protein, calcium, iron, potassium and omega-3s.

In a 2013 study published by the American Heart Association omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil were said to improve cardiovascular health, reduce risk of blood clots and lower blood pressure.

Not only this, but in order to get these benefits we have to add fish and omega 3 foods in our diet. Canada's Food Guide recommends Canadians consume at least two servings of fish per week for healthy adults.

But when it comes to the facts, some of it just plain stinks. From farm-raising fears to mind boggling mercury levels, consuming fish can raise some concerns. Eat Right Ontario, a dietitian service supported by the government of Ontario, warns against eating large fish like swordfish, marlin and orange roughy which tend to be higher in mercury.

Studies have shown a link between extremely high levels of mercury and brain development in young children however Health Canada suggest children, pregnant and breastfeeding women can benefit from regular consumption of fish.

Opening a can of sardines or tuna packed in water is a quick and easy way to fill up on those healthy fish fats, while wild salmon is touted for being more sustainable and carrying less contaminants than its farmed counterparts.

And if the waters are still too murky for you, the Cleveland Clinic is trying to make it a little easier. In the infographic below, the medical research and education centre lists everything from the best sources for omega-3 fatty acids along with the top five types of seafood with low amounts of mercury.

If fear is still keeping you away from reeling in those omega-3 benefits there are plenty of fish-free alternatives for omega-3s including flax seeds, chia seeds, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts. Check out the infographic below for even more vegan friendly alternatives.

infographic


ALSO ON HUFFPOST:

Close
Light Fish Recipes To Try
of
Share
Tweet
Advertisement
Share this
close
Current Slide

Around the Web

Omega-3 Fatty Acids - Harvard School of Public Health

Beyond multivitamins: Omega-3 fatty acids

6 Fish That Think You Should Find A Better Omega-3 Source

Fish remains best source for omega-3 fats