LIVING

These Green Homes Look A Lot Like Hobbit Homes

12/07/2015 05:27 EST | Updated 12/08/2015 06:59 EST
Green Magic Homes

Fans of The Lord of The Rings trilogy and other J.R.R. Tolkien classics can now live just like hobbits — in eco-friendly homes.

Green developers, Green Magic Homes, have designed energy efficient homes that can be shipped around the world.

The homes, which look like they've been plucked from the Shire, are made with fibre-reinforced polymer, which allows soil and turf to grow on it — so they look just like Hobbit holes. The greenery also helps reduce the temperature of the home and can double as a herb garden.

And unlike the lengthy construction time you'd typically expect when building a home, these Magic Homes only take three days to build among three people, Digital Trends reports.

Green Magic Homes includes everything you need to build the basic home structure, including windows and doors. If you want plumbing and that beautifully green roof, you'll have to grow it and install it yourself.

Starting at $14,998 for a 400-square-foot unit and going up to $34.74 per square foot of material for custom builds, these homes aren't just eco-friendly, they're wallet friendly too.

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