Justin Trudeau Named One Of Time's 100 Most Influential People

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JUSTIN TRUDEAU
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Just over six months after he was elected Canada's prime minister, Justin Trudeau has landed a spot on Time magazine's list of the 100 most influential people in the world.

The list, released Thursday, is divided into five categories: pioneers, titans, artists, leaders and icons.

In the leaders category, Trudeau joins the likes of — among many others — Russian President Vladimir Putin, U.S. President Barack Obama and Donald Trump, the current Republican frontrunner in America's electoral marathon.

Noted Canadian Ted Cruz, also a Republican candidate in the U.S. election, was also included in the survey.

Trudeau's profile in the Time list was written by fellow Canadian Lorne Michaels, the creator and executive producer of "Saturday Night Live." Michaels says he believes Trudeau will be "a force for good."

Not first list to honour Trudeau

"In many ways Canada is no longer the country I grew up in, but when I hear Justin Trudeau talk, it sounds like my Canada again. Bold, clear as a bell and progressive," Michaels writes.

"In politics as in show business, there are three things you need to be successful: talent, discipline and luck. Trudeau clearly has the first two. I wish him luck."

This isn't the first time Trudeau has landed a spot in a top 100 list at a major publication. In November 2015, less than a month into the Liberal party's majority mandate, Forbes magazine named him one of the world's most powerful people. Trudeau came in number 69 out of 73.

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