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PermaCorp Apologizes For Note Telling Workers To Be 'Thankful' For Their Jobs

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An Edmonton company has apologized after a photo of a whiteboard note telling workers they should be "thankful" for their jobs went viral.

On Monday, a Reddit user shared the picture, calling it a "sickening piece of corporate propaganda."

A sickening piece of corporate propaganda on the whiteboard of an Alberta company from canada

It reads:

Why you should be thankful for your job here at PermaCorp:

1. Our owners have wisely diversified the products and services that we offer in order to create multiple streams of income. This makes us relatively stable because we aren't relying on only one business sector to bring in money. i.e. only oil or only residential.

2. There are tens of thousands of people unemployed in Alberta right now.

3. Since Christmas I regularly come to work and find hundreds of resumes in my inbox. Sometimes more than one thousand. If I need to find another employee it is so easy. Be thankful that you are one of the lucky ones that already work here!

The note included an arrow pointing to a copy of a Calgary Herald article titled "With 40,000 jobs cut, more layoffs still to come for Canada's energy industry."

Hundreds of angry commenters flocked to the company's social media accounts to vent their outrage.

Permacorp responded to the backlash Monday, saying the message "was issued without management consent."

The company said the message was "promptly" taken down.

"Issues related to that message have been handled internally. The message sent does not align with our core values of personal growth and diversity," Permacorp said in a statement.

But despite the company's apology, some wanted an answer for a more pressing question at hand.

"So did whoever wrote on the whiteboard lose their job? I heard there's plenty of people ready to replace them," one commenter joked.

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