PARENTS

3 Little Girls Look Super Sweet Dressed Up As The 'Hidden Figures' Cast

01/31/2017 11:14 EST | Updated 01/31/2017 11:14 EST

"Hidden Figures" has created a ton of buzz since its release in early January.

The Oscar nominated film, which stars Taraji P. Henson, Janelle Monae and Octavia Spencer, tells the previously lesser known story of three historic and brilliant black women — Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson — who helped send astronaut John Glenn into space.

Many who've watched the film would probably agree that they left the theatre feeling inspired — including kids.

On Friday, Henson, who plays Katherine Johnson in the film, posted an adorable Instagram photo of three little girls dressed up as the main cast.


"OH MY GOODNESS IN HEAVEN I do what I do #SoTheBabiesCanDream #GodBlessTheBabies #Hope #TheFuture #BeInspired #Hiddenfigures #HiddenNoMore," the 46-year-old captioned the pic.

And while we don't know who these three little cuties are, the star's followers couldn't get over the sweet cosplay and the profound impact the film has had on black women.

"I am from Virginia. I'm so proud that you all decided to shine this light," one Instagram user wrote. "It made me so proud to be a black woman from Va ... For woman who would like to be entrepreneurs but are being held back. It's not that men don't think we can do it all.. They just don't like to compete and feel inferior to us ... We are smart. We are strong. We are the backbone of life. We will continue to rise. Jus keep fighting ladies. @tarajiphenson thank u."

Others said the picture gave them "chills."

Henson's costar, Spencer, recently bought out an entire theatre so low-income families could watch the movie together.

"My mom would not have been able to afford to take me and my siblings," she wrote on Instagram. "So, I'm honoring her and all single parents this #mlkweekend Pass the word."


If nothing else, "Hidden Figures" has single-handedly proved the power cinema has, and there's no doubt that it has helped empower young girls, especially young, black girls, to believe that they, too, can reach for the stars.

Also on HuffPost

Celebrities Raising Feminist Kids