Kim Kardashian To Have Surgery On Uterus To Carry A Third Child

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Whether you care about Kim Kardashian or not, you're likely aware the reality TV star has two children — and even that she experienced high risk pregnancies with each of them.

According to People, Kardashian was diagnosed with placenta accreta — a condition in which parts of the placenta attach to the uterine wall — during the births of daughter North West and son Saint. Rather than delivering the placenta as is normally the case, allowing the uterus to contract around the blood vessels, it must be taken out by doctors, sometimes leaving behind perforations that can make another pregnancy difficult, if not impossible.

kim kardashian north westSaint West, Kim Kardashian West, and North West leave their Midtown Manhattan hotel on February 1, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Raymond Hall/GC Images)

In a clip for this week's episode of "Keeping Up With The Kardashians," Kim reveals she has surgery scheduled to "kind of repair this hole, so they need to like clean that out and then there's scar tissue."

Though she doesn't go into details about specific complications (come on, they need to get you to watch the episode somehow), she does say in a direct-to-camera interview, "I've gone through so much with really bad deliveries that the doctors don't feel like it's safe for me to conceive again myself. This surgery is really the one last thing I can try."

In the past, Kardashian has discussed the potential of using a surrogate to carry a child, but expressed concerns about a lack of information regarding the option.

While not every parent has the choices available to them that Kardashian and husband Kanye West might have, speaking out publicly about issues surrounding pregnancy is helpful to the many parents who might feel like they're the only ones going through this — and for that, we definitely applaud this choice. And yes, we'll stay tuned to find out what happens too.

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