PARENTS

Chiropractor Shows Parents How To Properly Carry A Baby Car Seat

Goodbye, wrists that feel like they're going to fall off.

06/27/2017 16:34 EDT | Updated 06/27/2017 16:34 EDT

It's the kind of thing that they should teach in parenting classes, but they just don't.

When your baby is young, their car seat (also known as a baby bucket) is portable, which makes it so easy to take them from the car into the house.

But it's also massive.

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Seriously, they can easily weigh 10 pounds on their own, before you even put a baby inside.

And as part of the parental orientation, everyone tries to figure out the best way to shlep that thing without ruining their backs and necks and elbows and wrists.

Fortunately, one chiropractor has finally decided to reveal the secret that we've been looking for all along.

In a YouTube video, Dr. Emily Puente of Bridge Family Chiropractic in Mansfield, Texas, demonstrates a technique that seems anything but natural, but apparently, is the way to go to feel stable and pain-free when it comes to lugging around a bucket seat.

As she notes, the way most parents carry the bucket (at their side, looped over their wrists like a purse) can cause misalignment and discomfort. And for moms who are immediately postpartum and told not to carry anything heavier than the baby (but who are we kidding here?), this can be particularly helpful.

Other expert recommendations in the past have included carrying the bucket in front of you with both hands on the handle, according to Consumer Reports.

For moms who are immediately postpartum and told not to carry anything heavier than the baby (but who are we kidding here?), this can be particularly helpful.

"The greater the horizontal distance from the weight you're carrying to your torso, the more stress on your joints, discs, ligaments, and muscles," Mary Ellen Modica, a Chicago-based physical therapist, told the publication.

Whatever you do, make sure it feels comfortable for you — because that newborn will be tough enough on you without adding a backache to the mix.