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The Most Awe-Inspiring Photos Of The 2017 Solar Eclipse In Canada

A total solar eclipse happens about once every 18 months.

08/21/2017 17:32 EDT | Updated 08/22/2017 10:54 EDT
Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images
The solar eclipse at it maximum as viewed in Toronto on Aug. 21, 2017.

Once every 18 months or so, as the Earth, moon, and sun perform a cosmic ballet, something spectacular happens. The moon passes directly in front of the sun, and from certain places on Earth, day becomes night.

This is a total solar eclipse. Though they happen quite regularly, they are only visible from any given location about once every 375 years.

Canadians got to glimpse a partial eclipse on Monday, while much of the United States was treated to the aforementioned total solar eclipse.

THE CANADIAN PRESS
The moon covers the sun during a partial solar eclipse in Victoria on Aug. 21, 2017.

Jeff McIntosh/Canadian Press
Lens flare creates ghost images in this view of a partial solar eclipse from the Spark Science Centre in Calgary, on Aug. 21, 2017.

Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press
A set of binoculars is used backwards to project the moon passing in front of the sun onto a piece of paper during a partial solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017 in Chelsea, Que.

Chad Hipolito/Canadian Press
The moon covers the sun during a partial solar eclipse in Victoria on Aug. 21, 2017.

THE CANADIAN PRESS
A partial solar eclipse is seen from North Vancouver, B.C. on Aug. 21, 2017.

Steve Russell via Getty Images
The Aug. 21, 2017 partial solar eclipse at it maximum as viewed in Toronto.

Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images
A steaming pot shows the partial solar eclipse in its shadows in Toronto on Aug. 21, 2017.

Roberto Machado Noa/REX/Shutterstock
The sun was 70 per cent covered by the moon at peak eclipse hour when seen from the city of Toronto on Aug. 21, 2017.

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