LIVING

The Perfect Time To Take A Nap Is When You're Already Feeling Lethargic

It's great for your productivity.

08/22/2017 14:01 EDT | Updated 08/22/2017 14:02 EDT
Paul Bradbury

If you've got a nap room (or even a spare sofa) at your work, but haven't yet taken advantage of it, there's no time like the present to start a good daily habit.

Not only can naps increase productivity and brain power, they're also a great stress-reliever and a natural way to revive your energy.

And, according to science, there's a perfect time of the day to take a quick snooze: 3 p.m.

Getty Images

The reason why this specific time is so ideal for naps is because our circadian rhythm (basically our internal clock that cycles between sleepiness and alertness) dips in the mid-afternoon.

Put it this way: you know that time in the afternoon when you feel drowsy and you're barely working? That's the best time to grab a 20- to 30-minute nap, reports The Independent.

Just make sure to avoid over-sleeping. If your quick power nap turns into an hour-long slumber, you will actually wake up feeling groggy rather than rested, and you could have trouble falling asleep when you go to bed at night.

"When you're sleep deprived, only bad things happen to your mood, concentration, health, and immune system," Rajkumar Dasgupta, an assistant professor of clinical medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, explained to Tonic.

When you're sleep deprived, only bad things happen to your mood, concentration, health, and immune system.

This is a problem for many Canadians, as according to a 2016 study, Canada is the third most sleep-deprived country, with nearly a third of the Canadians feeling like they don't get enough shut-eye.

According to a 2017 report, about 20 per cent of Canadians get between six and seven hours of sleep every night (a typical goal is to get at least eight hours), and six per cent consistently get less than six hours a night.

Getty Images/iStockphoto

"Insufficient sleep has been found to be associated with a range of negative health and social outcomes, including adverse performance effects at school and in the labour market," the report said, noting that Canada loses about 600,000 working hours every year to lack of sleep.

Canada is the third most sleep-deprived country, with nearly a third of the Canadians feeling like they don't get enough shut-eye.

There are several reasons why people don't get enough sleep, including too much screen time, smoking, BMI, mental health and consuming sugary drinks.

If you do find yourself having trouble falling asleep at night, there are several things you can try out, such as establishing a regular bedtime routine, getting plenty of exercise, reducing the time you spend on your phone before bed, and practicing mindfulness.

Also on HuffPost: