STYLE

Emily Ratajkowski Wants The Fashion Industry To Stop Photoshopping 'Natural' Beauty

The model called out a magazine for Photoshopping her lips and breasts.

09/18/2017 10:53 EDT | Updated 09/18/2017 10:53 EDT
Desiree Navarro via Getty Images
Emily Ratajkowski attends Rihanna's 3rd Annual Diamond Ball at Cipriani Wall Street on September 14, 2017 in New York City. (Desiree Navarro/WireImage)

Photoshop can play an important part in creating a beautiful image. It can help elevate a photograph from good to gorgeous and fix any mistakes a photographer may have missed.

But there comes a time when Photoshop shouldn't play a part in the creation an image, and Emily Ratajkowski is testament to that.

Over the weekend the model took to Instagram to share her disappointment with Madame Figaro magazine for photoshopping her image on their latest cover.

Specifically, the 26-year-old actress pointed out that the magazine's photo editors retouched her lips and her breasts, making them both smaller.

"Everyone is uniquely beautiful in their own ways. We all have insecurities about the things that make us different from a typical ideal of beauty. I, like so many of us, try every day to work past those insecurities. I was extremely disappointed to see my lips and breasts altered in photoshop on this cover. I hope the fashion industry will finally learn to stop trying to stifle the things that make us unique and instead begin to celebrate individuality," Ratajkowski wrote.

Everyone is uniquely beautiful in their own ways. We all have insecurities about the things that make us different from a typical ideal of beauty.

Her post garnered lots of support from fans, who shared their disappointment with the magazine.

"How dare they! Love your natural beauty 💕," wrote one commentator, while another wrote, "You go girl 💪🏻❤️everyone is beautiful in the own way and u don't need to be altered. Ur slaying 😍."

Shot at home in LA by @livincool

A post shared by Emily Ratajkowski (@emrata) on

Ratajkowski has never been shy about talking about her body, women's sexuality and sexism.

In a recent interview with Allure, the Instagram star said women should be proud to display their breasts because they're beautiful.

"It really bothers me that people are so offended by breasts. That's when I realized how f***ed our culture is. When we see breasts, we don't think of beauty and femininity. We think of vulgar, over sexualized images."

When we see breasts, we don't think of beauty and femininity. We think of vulgar, over sexualized images.

Last year, the "Gone Girl" star stood up in defence of Kim Kardashian, after the reality TV star posted a nude selfie on social media and received a ton of criticism.

She then joined Kardashian for a topless selfie, as an FU to the haters.

In a Lenny Letter she wrote last year, Ratajkowski told women that they should celebrate their bodies and their sexuality, and warned of the dangers of photoshopped celebrities.

"The implications is that to be sexual is to be trashy because being sexy means playing into men's desires. To me, 'sexy' is a kind of beauty, a kind of self-expression, one that is to be celebrated, one that is wonderfully female," she wrote.

Mike Marsland/WireImage
Emily Ratajkowski attends the 'Loveless (Nelyubov)' screening during the 70th annual Cannes Film Festival at Palais des Festivals on May 18, 2017 in Cannes, France. (Photo by Mike Marsland/Mike Marsland/WireImage)

​​​"Why does the implication have to that sex is a thing men get to take from women and women give up? Most adolescent women are introduced to 'sexy' women through porn or Photoshopped images of celebrities.

"Is that the only example of a sexual woman we will provide to the young women of our culture? Where can girls look to see women who find empowerment in deciding when and how to be or feel sexual? Even if being sexualized by society's gaze is demeaning, there must be a space where women can still be sexual when they choose to be."

Why does the implication have to that sex is a thing men get to take from women and women give up?

In a 2016 interview with Harper's Bazaar, Ratajkowski opened up about how the entertainment industry's harmful and narrow beauty ideals affected her from a young age.

"I genuinely hit puberty before everyone. So I really was more sexual than my classmates," she said.

Getty Images for Clara Lionel Fo
Emily Ratajkowski attends Rihanna's 3rd Annual Diamond Ball Benefitting The Clara Lionel Foundation at Cipriani Wall Street on September 14, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Clara Lionel Fo)

"My teachers, my boyfriends, my parents' friends didn't understand how complex it all was. Because of third-wave feminism, I understood that there are all of these fucked-up ideals of beauty put on young women; that there was something to be scared about in the entertainment world. But yet the people I knew in my everyday life, they (didn't realize) their faux paus, their missteps, and since they knew me it was much harder because the comments felt personal."

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