LIVING

Women Are More Likely To Cheat On Their Partners During This Specific Time Frame

While men have a less specific window.

11/09/2017 10:20 EST | Updated 11/10/2017 10:28 EST

"The Seven Year Itch" may have been on to something.

New research has identified a specific time frame in which women are more likely to cheat on their long-term partners.

A study, published in The Journal of Sex Research, found that women are more likely to be unfaithful between year six and year 10 of their relationship.

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Researchers also looked at male infidelity and found that men have a less specific window — specifically, they found that men were more likely to commit adultery after 11 years of being in a relationship.

These findings were revealed after researchers conducted two surveys involving 423 people. Each of these participants completed a survey on the perceived importance of resisting the temptation to cheat. They also answered questions on how likely they would cheat given the opportunity.

The study also published findings on what made people resist cheating, citing a fear of remaining alone should their partner find out about their possible adultery, moral standards, and religious reasons. Less so were reasons about the effects on their partner, and any children they may have.

Men were more likely to commit adultery after 11 years of being in a relationship.

The findings come just a few months after another study revealed women with a certain job are more likely to be unfaithful.

According to that study, women who are housewives are more likely to cheat on their partners, citing a "sense of loneliness, thanks to a lack of satisfaction in her marriage."

"This loneliness is further compounded for housewives, who potentially spend hours alone, only to further be neglected when their husbands come home," noted Christian Grant, a spokesman for Illicit Encounters, which conducted the study.

That study also found that men who are tall, smart, and wealthy are more likely to be unfaithful because their cheating is driven by ego and lust, as opposed to loneliness.

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And despite the finding that women cheat in a specific time frame of their relationship, multiple studies suggest that men cheat more than women, as women are socially conditioned to cheat far less.

"Women are known to be more sensitive to social pressure than men and there has always been more pressure on proper sexual behaviour on women," Michèle Binswanger, a Swiss journalist and author of Cheating: A Handbook for Women, told The Independent.

"Also they traditionally had fewer opportunities because they were more likely to stay at home with the kids," she added.

Women are known to be more sensitive to social pressure than men and there has always been more pressure on proper sexual behaviour on women.

Binswanger's insight also confirms what previous studies have suggested, which is that women's thoughts about what a successful, meaningful relationship should look like have changed.

"Today women have higher expectations about their sex life than 40 years ago, they want to experiment and are generally more independent," Binswanger said, adding that most women who cheat on their partners not only feel frustrated with their relationship, but with their lives in general.

"Many felt undesired, unheard or just unhappy, so they started looking for excitement," Binswanger noted.

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