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5 Canadian Destinations You've Probably Never Considered for a Fall Vacation

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Travellers flock to Cape Breton Island's Cabot Trail and Quebec's Laurentian Mountains to admire Canada's fall foliage this time of year. However, fall travellers are missing out on a number of lesser known Canadian destinations that pack just as much punch in terms of fall fun. These six underrated Canadian destinations will inspire you to get off the beaten path this autumn.

Nelson, British Columbia

Canada's kaleidoscope of fall colors doesn't just exist in the country's easternmost provinces. Also known as, "The Queen City," Nelson is nestled in British Columbia's tree-covered Selkirk Mountains. Watch as the mountains and tree-lined streets turn fiery shades of gold and yellow while enjoying fall temperatures that hover between 13- and 22-degrees Celsius in September and October. Nelson's location on the west end of Kootenay Lake and seconds from the area's best hiking and mountain biking trails mean outdoor recreation, as well as walking the charming city streets, are activities that extend through the months of September, October, and November.

Cavendish, Prince Edward Island

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Photo credit: Dennis Jarvis

Cavendish's microscopic size and even smaller population shouldn't steer you away. This rural beach town is the perfect place to soak up summer's last rays on the shores of the salty Gulf of St. Lawrence. Special fall packages make trips to the beach more affordable, and attractions like Aiden's Deep Sea Fishing, the Anne of Green Gables Museum, area golf courses, and locally famous seafood restaurants stay open well into September and October.

Whitehorse, Yukon

Whitehorse is the capital city of Canada's Yukon territory. Despite its standing as the Yukon's largest city (with a population of roughly 28,000), the city is often overlooked by Canadian and international travellers. The city sits in front of a backdrop of rolling mountain tops and is home to a host of historic hotels, quaint cafes, locally-owned shops, and delightful eateries that let you know you've traveled to the far north.

Adventurous leaf peepers will love the Fall Colour Aurora Borealis Tour by Northern Tales. The five-day-long tour begins in downtown Whitehorse and heads into the nearby wilderness for optimal northern lights viewing. A scenic cruise along the Alaska Highway to Haines Junction and beyond allows travellers to admire the Yukon's famously golden fall foliage set against rugged countryside.

Twillingate, Newfoundland and Labrador

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Photo credit: KimManleyOrt

Twillingate is another seaside city that encourages you to squeeze the last bit of warmth and sunshine out of summer. Known as the "Iceberg Capital of the World," this small Newfoundland fishing town is known for its dramatic Atlantic Ocean scenery, abundance of boat tours, year-round lighthouses, scenic hiking trails, and mouthwatering seafood. Fall in Twillingate means affordable accommodation prices, uncrowded hiking trails, berry picking, wine tasting, and countless stops at the Cozy Tea Room.

Churchill, Manitoba

You don't have to like the snow and ice to fall in love with Churchill, Manitoba. Many travellers shy away from this thrilling town along the Hudson Bay for its chilly temperatures, but you'll quickly forget about the weather when you see polar bears cruising along the tundra and find yourself admiring the northern lights from the back of a dogsled. Fall is the best time of year to see more than 250 species of birds, polar bears, and beluga whales, but the charming downtown area, packed with cozy cafes, shops, and lodges, invites you to spend time exploring indoors too.

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