ENTERTAINMENT

Chester Bennington's 'Carpool Karaoke' Episode Airs Three Months After His Death

The episode was taped just days before the Linkin Park singer took his own life.

10/12/2017 13:49 EDT | Updated 10/12/2017 13:49 EDT

On Thursday, Linkin Park shared their “Carpool Karaoke” episode alongside actor Ken Jeong, taped less than a week before lead singer Chester Bennington’s death by suicide on July 20.

The episode, in which the band and the “Dr. Ken” star drive around and sing along to everything from Outkast’s “Hey Ya” to the rock band’s own “Numb,” is a spinoff of the popular bit from James Corden’s “Late Late Show.”

“I forgot the words, I’m having so much fun!” Bennington says at one point during a sing-along to the band’s song “In the End.” “This is the best!”

Linkin Park posted the episode for free on their Facebook page, noting at the beginning of the video that it is shared “with the blessing of Chester’s family and his bandmates.” They also dedicate the video “to the memory of Chester.”

In August, Corden said that the decision to air the “Carpool Karaoke” episode was up to Bennington’s family.

“We consider it not our decision to make,” he said at the time. “We will navigate it as delicately as possible and just adhere to whatever wishes they would want.”

Bennington died at age 41 after being found in his Southern California home. The singer had been on vacation in Arizona with his wife, Talinda, and family, but had returned home to work.

Talinda, who was married to Bennington for 12 years, shared a video on Twitter in September of her late husband laughing with his family. “This is what depression looked like just 36 hrs b4 his death,” she wrote.

The band also directed viewers to the One More Light fund, created in Bennington’s memory. The fund, part of Linkin Park’s Music for Relief initiative, will “honor his generous spirit and his desire to help others,” according to the website.

If you or someone you know needs help, call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. You can also text HELLO to 741-741 for free, 24-hour support from the Crisis Text Line. Outside of the U.S., please visit the International Association for Suicide Prevention for a database of resources.

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