The Blog

Featuring fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost's signature lineup of contributors

r/ally Headshot

Most Canadians Don't Expect a Bonus This Year -- Do You?

Posted: Updated:

Not expecting a holiday bonus for 2013? If you're Canadian then you share the majority's sentiment. According to the WorkMonitor survey done by Randstad, a staffing, recruitment and HR services firm, only 37 per cent of Canadians expect to be rewarded by their employers for working hard throughout the year with a bonus. That means only one in three Canadians expect to get a little something extra from their boss as 2013 draws to a close.

Apparently, Canadians don't share the same optimism as other workers around the globe since that's 11 per cent lower than the average worldwide. Most of the workers or 73.5 per cent in Asia, for example, expect a bonus. Hong Kong leads the pack with 85 per cent expecting to get bonuses. Latin American workers are also quite optimistic that a reward is in store for them as 77 per cent expect a bonus from their employers.

Canada, however, is not the most pessimistic. In Switzerland, only 11 per cent -- that's roughly one-in-10 employees -- believe they will be rewarded this holiday season.

Despite their pessimism about receiving any extra compensation, the survey showed that 23 per cent or one-in-four Canadian workers feel that they have to be available for their employers during the holiday break. Randstad says this can be very costly as work overload results in lost revenue to the tune of $3 billion a year due to absenteeism.

That impulse to be in touch with work colleagues during the holiday season comes from the employees as well, with 41 per cent of Canadians proactively checking in with their offices even during the holidays just to be updated. Another 29 per cent say they just cannot resist their work-related email even while on vacation.

"We keep a close eye on how Canadians are feeling in their jobs and looking at 2013, many Canadians are definitely burning the candle at both ends," said Randstad Canada President Tom Turpin. "A lack of relaxation both physically and virtually will eventually take its toll and isn't good for either the employee's health and wellbeing, or the company's bottom line," he added.

Written By Nicel Jane Avellana, contributor at r/ally, the mobile collaboration platform that lets you socialize your goals.