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My Life Changed The Moment I Stopped Settling For Mediocrity

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After working in the corporate world in the United States and Canada for a decade, I started to feel empty inside. My personal and career relationships were intact, but like many nine to fivers, I knew that there was more to life than the four walls of my cubicle. I dreamed about working from home as a writer, but I didn't have the confidence to pursue my dreams.

According to the Consumer Health Digest, "it is a fact that the most common time to have a heart attack or a stroke is 6:30 am." The sad part about this fact is it is right around the time that most people are getting ready to go to work. I remember the day when a very wise friend of mine told me to pay attention to people driving to work to prove to me that most employees are unhappy with what they do every day. The truth is, I was one of those people, and I felt like a zombie helping the owner of the company I worked for make his dreams come true as I ignored mine.

My very first job was about thirteen years ago when I was living in South Florida working in customer service during a night shift. Watching the sunset as I was working like a slave was depressing. I wanted more out of life, and deep down inside, it felt like I was settling for a job to pay bills.

stressed woman

One of the most pivotal moments in my life was in Toronto at a job interview with an employment agency. The interviewer asked me, "why are you here? Your resume states that you have a degree in Journalism. You should be pursuing a career that you are passionate about." I was speechless, but she was right. Why did it take me eight years to take the advice of a stranger?

After I found the courage to find a part time remote job, I applied for a few positions and one company replied. As I worked a full-time job, I began moonlighting while staying up late at night finishing assignments even losing hours of sleep to fill the void of emptiness. The only writing sample I had at that time was a newsletter I completed while working for a previous employer. I wasn't expecting companies to take me seriously.

At that time, I had more companies rejecting my work then one can imagine but I couldn't let the fire of ambition die out. The minute I started to tell myself "this is the only way that I can live my life," it was as if the universe opened its doors and more opportunities arrived.

One day I woke up in the morning and asked myself, "why not me? There are many people that are pursuing their true passion. If they can do it, I can too." After a few years of moonlighting, I found a solid full-time remote opportunity. It felt as if the shackles of mediocrity disappeared from my hands and feet. Although my heart was racing and my mind started to think of a list of 'what if's,' I couldn't live another day of my life being someone that I am not. I no longer wanted to tell my family friends that my life was fine because it wasn't.

To those of you that have big dreams, act now.

The reason why I wrote this blog because there are many people that can relate to the person I used to be. Some people are lowering their standards to continue a career that they are no longer passionate about. My goal is to help you realize that it is your birthright to have anything that you desire.

I used to reminisce on the past wondering how life would be if I had pursued a career in Journalism after I graduated from College. What I began to realize is living in the past will only keep me stagnant. Not only has the quality of my life improved the moment I stopped settling for mediocrity but it set a higher standard in other areas of my life.

To those of you that have big dreams, act now. Don't let fear or doubt stop you. No matter how old you are or what your situation is, the moment you stop making excuses and take action, your life will never be the same again.

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