Huffpost Canada Living ca
The Blog

Featuring fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost's signature lineup of contributors

Mennonite Girls Can Cook Headshot

Old-Fashioned Apricot Jam

Posted: Updated:

2013-08-05-apricotjam.jpg

There is nothing like old-fashioned apricot jam on a piece of toast with some cheddar cheese to top it. Everyone has their favourite way to dip into apricot jam; maybe you can suggest your favorite apricot jam treat for our readers.

This jam has no added pectin but it thickens and is still soft. I was taught by a fantastic Mennonite baker many years ago that if you wanted to bake cookies with jam inside it was best to use jam that had no pectin because it helps the jam to not absorb into the cookie, which makes your cookie hollow. So if you are planning on making jam jams this year for Christmas you may want to put up your apricot jam now. I store my jam in the freezer where it always tastes as fresh as the day it was made. If you want to store your jam in the pantry, it is recommended that you use a hot water processing bath.

  • 9 cups washed and diced apricots (about 5 pounds whole apricots)
  • 6 cups white sugar
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  1. You will need 10 - 1 cup / 250 ml jam jars. Wash the jars and place them in a 225 F oven for 10 minutes to sterilize them. Sterilize the lids in boiling water.
  2. Combine all the ingredients in a heavy large pot. Stir together well and then turn the heat to medium-high and stir until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture comes to a boil.
  3. Continue to boil the mixture. Set the timer to 30 minutes and stir every few minutes to be sure the mixture doesn't stick to the bottom of the pot. If your pot is a good quality you should have no problem with it burning on the bottom but if you are at all unsure, it is best to stir often to ensure all your hard work is not ruined by burned jam.
  4. At first the jam will foam on top but this will eventually go away and your jam will begin to thicken slightly. Put a small plate in the freezer when the jam is near the 30 minute mark. Take the plate out after a few minutes and spoon a teaspoon of jam on the plate and allow it to cool. When the jam slowly drips down and has a thickened consistency the jam is finished. My jam usually takes about 30 - 35 minutes.
  5. Ladle the jam into jars leaving 3/4 inch space. Place lids and screw tops on the jars and cool. Once cool, store the jam in a refrigerator or freeze it.
For more tasty recipes visit us at www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca
Jams, Jellies And Preserves
of
Share
Tweet
Advertisement
Share this
close
Current Slide