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Dear Toronto, Please Stop Freaking Out About A Bit Of Snow

03/13/2017 04:14 EDT | Updated 03/13/2017 07:01 EDT

Listen up, Toronto. We need to talk about your irrational response to a tiny bit of snow.

Earlier on Monday, Environment Canada was calling for as much as 30 centimetres of snowfall in the GTA overnight. That amount has now been downgraded to about 15 centimetres.

But you're still freaking out about this "major snowstorm."

As this Twitter user warned, you need to "brace yourselves."

Brace yourselves for what, exactly?

A potentially longer commute tomorrow morning? A bit of snow to shovel? A frosty windshield?

My colleagues in the Toronto HuffPost Canada office concede you haven't even had a bad winter. A bit of snow here and there, some colder temperatures, occasionally.

But, for perspective, let's take a look at other places across Canada that have really had to deal with weather trials and tribulations this season.

Just this past weekend, Newfoundland and Labrador was hit with a gruesome windstorm that left tens of thousands of people without power.

Wind speeds as high as 180 km/h blew roofs off buildings (or blew buildings off foundations entirely) and downed power lines, in what Environment Canada said was the strongest storm to hit the province in a decade.

newfoundland storm

The damage from Saturday's windstorm is evident Sunday, March 12, 2017 in the St. John's metro area. Residents in Newfoundland and Labrador are taking stock of the damage caused by this Saturday's fearsome windstorm. (Photo: Paul Daly/The Canadian Press)

And a snowstorm earlier this month on Newfoundland's Northern Peninsula left drivers having to navigate between these massive walls of snow:


In Manitoba, six people spent three days stranded on a highway, after a massive blizzard left roads impassable last week.

ernest castel

Ernest Castel spent three days stranded in -20 C weather because a snowstorm made the road he was driving on impassable.

Or how about this poor soul, not so far from Toronto, who discovered his Webster, N.Y. home completely encased in ice on the shores of Lake Ontario.

For one second, put yourselves in the snow boots of the school children in the Arctic hamlet of Kugaaruk, Nunavut, who lost their only school to a fire earlier this month, which couldn't be put out because temperatures fell to a record-breaking -60 C.

nunavut school

The destroyed school in Kugaaruk. (Photo: Courtesy Aglukka Wally/Facebook)

Or how about the folks across the Maritimes who grappled with back-to-back blizzards in February, that brought entire cities to a standstill?

halifax storm snow blizzard A pedestrian walks down Brunswick Street in Halifax on Feb. 13, 2017. (Photo: Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)

And, let's not forget the poor people of southern B.C., who have totally failedheroically dealt with record snowfall this season. (To be fair, they get a pass, as they historically haven't had to deal with the responsibilities of a true Canadian winter.)


Listen. I get it. I really do. In Calgary, where I live, it started snowing on October 8, and hasn't really let up since. It's been a cold winter, and last week it snowed for seven days straight.

We're all Canadian, and with that comes Canadian weather and it should be our Canadian duty to accept the weather (especially such unremarkable weather) with dignity and poise.

Because when you start freaking out about a dusting of snow, and tagging your posts with #snowmaggedon2017 and other such nonsense, the rest of Canada is just going to laugh at you.

Instead, follow the lead of this fine Canadian, and make the country laugh with you.


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