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Murtaza Haider

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Islam At War -- With Itself

Posted: 06/25/2013 12:25 pm

Another day, another suicide bomb blast, and dozens more Muslims killed at the hands of other Muslims.

From Aleppo in Syria to Quetta in Balochistan, Muslims are engaged in the slaughter of other Muslims. The numbers are enormous: over 93,000 killed in the Syrian civil war and over 48,000 dead in Pakistan. Millions have perished in similar intra-Muslim conflicts in the past four decades. Many wonder if the belief in Islam was sufficient to bind Muslims in peace with each other.

Since the end of the Second World War, the world has moved in two distinct directions. The West, mostly Christian, has tried to minimize intra-European conflict and has largely been successful with some exceptions. The Muslim world, on the other hand, has fallen into one violent conflict after another, involving mostly Muslims. Several intra-Muslim conflicts continue to simmer as proxy wars. In the eighties, the Iran-Iraq war alone left millions dead. More recently, a car bomb in Iraq on Sunday killed another 39 in the sectarian warfare between the Shias and Sunnis that killed at least 1,045 in May 2013.

As the violence amongst Muslims increases, most Muslims prefer denial or looking for scapegoats. Those in denial believe no such violence exists and the entire issue is made up by the Western-controlled media. Others find scapegoats -- Indians and Americans are the most frequently blamed. The overwhelming evidence, however, suggests that the sectarian and tribal divisions amongst Muslims and justifying violence in the name of religion are the primary reasons Islam is at war with itself.

In Pakistan, confessions and appalling claims of responsibility by the spokespersons for the Taliban and Lashkar-e-Jhangavi should leave no doubt about where the guilt resides. At the same time, the Pakistani Intelligence agencies have put together incriminating evidence running into hundreds of thousands of pages against the extremist sectarian outfits, Al-Qaeda affiliates, the nationalist militias in Balochistan, and others who have perpetrated indiscriminate violence against civilians and the state resulting in over 48,000 deaths since 2004.

And while the Muslim on Muslim violence is claiming victims all over Pakistan, the violence against non-Muslims, including Hindus and Christians, often brings together Muslims of different stripes, who would otherwise be fighting each other, in attacking religious minorities.

The targeted killings of university professors in Karachi and Quetta, the murder of Shia doctors and professionals, and the attacks on the shrines of patron saints are all evidence of the fact that Muslims have been killing other Muslims while being motivated by hate and using Islam to justify violence.

Why is it that the shared belief in Islam is not sufficient to prevent violence amongst Muslims? From the very first day Muslims are taught that their belief in Islam trumps all other identities that they may hold. Their skin colour, tribe, caste or creed -- none matters once they enter the fold of Islam. Why then have millions of Muslims died at the hands of their fellow believers?

Political, religious, and other leaders in the Muslim world have kept the dialogue focused on the conflicts where Muslims have been the victims. The Bosnian conflict, the communal violence in India, which has caused the death of thousands of Muslims, and the Arab-Israeli conflict have been the focus of Muslim leaders. Seldom does the dialogue focus on why Muslims kill other Muslims. And even if the topic ever comes up, it ends up being an exercise in mass scapegoating.

Muslim societies have thus evolved into places where revenge is confused with justice, forgiveness with weakness, and peace with cowardice. These are the places where unholy men wage holy wars against unarmed civilians, pitting Muslims against other Muslims.

Back to Quetta

Imagine the state of mind of the person who wore a suicide vest and boarded the bus carrying young women whose bright faces were lit with the pride of being educated. There was no reason to attack these innocent women who were unarmed and unrelated to any conflict. But that did not deter the suicide bomber who proceeded to kill them and herself in a suicide attack in Quetta this month.

Somewhere in or near Quetta a group of men chanted with pride, Allah-u-Akbar (God is great), eulogizing the female suicide bomber for killing the very women who held the most promise for Pakistan. Their spokesperson called the news outlets to claim responsibility for the attack on unarmed women. Later, at the Bolan Medical Complex in Quetta, another group of men, armed with AK-47 and wearing suicide vests, engaged the security personnel in a standoff that left several more dead, including four nurses who were attending to the wounded from the earlier blast.

This was all done in the name of Islam. This will be repeated sooner than later. Some would argue this is not the "real" Islam. Does it really matter what real Islam is when its true followers cannot stand up to those who use religion to commit genocide?

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  • A supporter of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri poses with a victory sign at a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistani ministers held talks with a cleric leading a mass protest in Islamabad in an attempt to avert a political crisis and end a demonstration that has heaped pressure on the fragile government. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A supporter of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri waves the national flag at a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistani ministers held talks with a cleric leading a mass protest in Islamabad in an attempt to avert a political crisis and end a demonstration that has heaped pressure on the fragile government. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri gather at a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistani ministers held talks with a cleric leading a mass protest in Islamabad in an attempt to avert a political crisis and end a demonstration that has heaped pressure on the fragile government. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri addresses his supporters from his makeshift room at a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistani ministers held talks with a cleric leading a mass protest in Islamabad in an attempt to avert a political crisis and end a demonstration that has heaped pressure on the fragile government. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri chant slogans at a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistani ministers held talks with a cleric leading a mass protest in Islamabad in an attempt to avert a political crisis and end a demonstration that has heaped pressure on the fragile government. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri chant slogans at a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistani ministers held talks with a cleric leading a mass protest in Islamabad in an attempt to avert a political crisis and end a demonstration that has heaped pressure on the fragile government. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A supporter of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri holds a placard at a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistani ministers held talks with a cleric leading a mass protest in Islamabad in an attempt to avert a political crisis and end a demonstration that has heaped pressure on the fragile government. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri gather inthe rain at a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistani ministers held talks with a cleric leading a mass protest in Islamabad in an attempt to avert a political crisis and end a demonstration that has heaped pressure on the fragile government. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri gather at a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistani ministers held talks with a cleric leading a mass protest in Islamabad in an attempt to avert a political crisis and end a demonstration that has heaped pressure on the fragile government. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of Pakistani moderate preacher Tahir-ul Qadri gather on the fourth day of a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistan's President intervened to stop authorities from using force against protesters who are calling for parliament to be dissolved in Islamabad's largest political rally in years. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A supporter of Pakistani moderate preacher Tahir-ul Qadri waves the national flag on the fourth day of a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. Pakistan's President intervened to stop authorities from using force against protesters who are calling for parliament to be dissolved in Islamabad's largest political rally in years. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri gesture the victory symbol during a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. A populist Pakistani cleric calling for electoral reforms announced that a mass sit-in of tens of thousands of people camped outside parliament in Islamabad would end January 17. (FAROOQ NAEEM/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri gather in the rain during a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. A populist Pakistani cleric calling for electoral reforms announced that a mass sit-in of tens of thousands of people camped outside parliament in Islamabad would end January 17. (FAROOQ NAEEM/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A supporter of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri wears a plastic bag in the rain during a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. A populist Pakistani cleric calling for electoral reforms announced that a mass sit-in of tens of thousands of people camped outside parliament in Islamabad would end January 17. (FAROOQ NAEEM/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A supporter of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri enjoys the rain at a protest rally in Islamabad on January 17, 2013. A populist Pakistani cleric calling for electoral reforms announced that a mass sit-in of tens of thousands of people camped outside parliament in Islamabad would end January 17. (FAROOQ NAEEM/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Female supporters of moderate preacher Tahir-ul Qadri stand guard to protect sleeping women taking part in the fourth day of protests in Islamabad early on January 17, 2013. Pakistan's president on January 16 intervened to stop authorities from using force against protesters who are calling for parliament to be dissolved in Islamabad's largest political rally in years. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri rest on the third day of the protest rally in Islamabad on January 16, 2013. A populist cleric Wednesday urged Pakistani politicians to join tens of thousands taking part in the largest protest in Islamabad for years, ratcheting up the pressure on the government to step down. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Pakistani students, civil society and Pakistan Muslim League Nawaz party activists light candles in the favor of democracy in Lahore on January 16, 2013. Pakistan's main opposition leader Nawaz Sharif demanded January 16, that the government immediately announce a timetable for elections. (Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A supporter of Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri dances to drums on the third day of the protest rally in Islamabad on January 16, 2013. A populist cleric Wednesday urged Pakistani politicians to join tens of thousands taking part in the largest protest in Islamabad for years, ratcheting up the pressure on the government to step down. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Activists of the ruling Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) burn tyres on a street at a protest rally in Lahore on January 16, 2013, against the Supreme Court order to arrest of the prime minister Raja Pervez Ashraf. Pakistan's top judge January 15, ordered the arrest of the prime minister over graft allegations, threatening to worsen turmoil as thousands of protesters demanded the government step down. (Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A Pakistani villager from the northwest mourns the death of a relative during a protest in the provincial capital Peshawar on January 16, 2013. Demonstrators said gunmen wearing military uniforms stormed homes in Bara Tehsil in Khyber Agency, some 30 kilometers from Peshawar and shot 18 villagers dead in an overnight raid. (A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of moderate preacher Tahir-ul Qadri rest on the third day of a protest rally in Islamabad on January 16, 2013. Pakistani protesters rallied for a third day January 16 in the largest political demonstration seen for years in the capital, calling on the government to quit after the Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the prime minister. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of moderate preacher Tahir-ul Qadri prepare breakfast at dawn on the third day of a protest rally in Islamabad on January 16, 2013. Pakistani protesters rallied for a third day January 16 in the largest political demonstration seen for years in the capital, calling on the government to quit after the Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the prime minister. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Pakistani Frionter Constables (FC) and policemen stand guard over a barricade of shipping containers on Constitution avenue on the third day of a protest rally in Islamabad on January 16, 2013. Pakistani protesters rallied for a third day January 16 in the largest political demonstration seen for years in the capital, calling on the government to quit after the Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the prime minister. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A supporter of moderate preacher Tahir-ul Qadri waves this Pakistani national flag on the third day of a protest rally in Islamabad on January 16, 2013. An estimated 25,000 to 50,000 people have poured into Islamabad from across the country, devoted followers of moderate preacher Tahir-ul Qadri who is calling for the government to step down and radical reforms. It is the largest protest in the capital since the Pakistan People's Party won elections in 2008, ending a decade of military rule and forming what in March will be the country's first civilian government to complete a term in office. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Supporters of moderate preacher Tahir-ul Qadri gather on the third day of a protest rally in Islamabad on January 16, 2013. An estimated 25,000 to 50,000 people have poured into Islamabad from across the country, devoted followers of moderate preacher Tahir-ul Qadri who is calling for the government to step down and radical reforms. It is the largest protest in the capital since the Pakistan People's Party won elections in 2008, ending a decade of military rule and forming what in March will be the country's first civilian government to complete a term in office. (ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

 

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