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10 Packing Tips for Traveling Families

Posted: 02/18/2014 11:12 am

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Packing properly for your family vacation can make or break your trip. We aren't talking about a monumental monstrosity that can't be remedied, but, it's always great to be prepared for anything. Whether you travel often or travel occasionally, if you have a game plan, you'll do just fine.

Often times, when you are packing for yourself and your children, it can be overwhelming. But, packing doesn't have to be you sitting on your suitcase while your partner zips it shut.

1. Plan ahead.
If you have small children, it's best to do all laundry at least one week ahead. If you have older kids, they can help by picking, sorting and washing the clothes they will need. For smaller children, it's best to have more than less. Avoid light colors that get soiled easily and always pack plenty of socks and undies. Bring a warm set of pajamas, as well as a cool one. Sometimes it can get really hot or really cold in hotel rooms.

Make sure your child has two outfits for every day that you are staying. Unless your child is older and can interchange items to use them more than once. With smaller kids, spills and accidents happen and it's always best to have what you need. Choose clothes that are versatile, comfortable and can be worn more than once.

For shoes, wear your bulkier pair and place a pair of sandals/flip-flops/water shoes in your front pocket of your luggage. If you need formal shoes, pack them in your luggage and stuff your socks into the shoes to save space.

If you are traveling to colder climates, bring clothes that can be layered, like fleece. Wear or carry your coat, hat, scarves and gloves or place them in your carry on. Most importantly, be sure to have travel insurance that will cover you in the event of cancelled flights, lost luggage and (knock on wood) any health issue that may arise.

2. Choose your luggage.
Lay out all the luggage you will be taking in advance. This is for the purpose so you won't be looking for it last minute. Choose the carry-on bags you will be using and set them aside as well. Choose a unique ribbon or string that you can attach to all of your luggages' front zippers. This way, you can pick out your luggage from the wide array of luggages that all look the same as they go around the carousel.

Place all of your ID, reservations and documents in a safe place where you will be able to access it. Preferably your carry-on or purse/satchel that you will have on you at all times. You have the option of wearing a travel belt that goes underneath your clothes as well. Depending where you are travelling to, take copies of your passports and place them with your ID. That way, when you venture out at your destination, you can leave your passports in a safe at your hotel room and take a copy of your ID and have it with you at all times.

3. Cross pack.
If you are checking your bags, consider cross-packing. Put a few essential items/outfits in your luggage for your partner and some of your kids in yours. And vice versa. That way, for some reason, your luggages are lost and don't arrive with you to your destination, you will have at least one outfit to hold you over until you get your bags or buy new items.

4. Roll your clothes.
If you are travelling to somewhere warm, I always make it a point to pack a light sweater and long pants. In the case you arrive and your sunny skies are nowhere to be seen and you are met with below season temperatures. Even sunny Florida gets chilly during cooler months and believe me, Disney isn't fun when you're shivering. Pack your favorite Mickey sweater and roll it up. In fact, roll as many items of clothes that you can to make room in your luggage. Pack jeans, they wrinkle less easily or tights (for the ladies/girls) that are light and take up less space. What makes your luggage bulky is trapped air, when you roll as many items as you can, you can take more and use less space.

5. Itsy Bitsy, Teenie Weenie Polka Dot Bikini? Bring two.
If you are traveling somewhere tropical, make sure to bring at least two bathing suits or swim trunks. That way one can dry while you wear the other. For kids, this is especially true because they will be in their bathing suits a lot. Don't forget sun hats, sunglasses and swim goggles. Make sure to pack plenty of sun screen for the length of your trip. If you have full-size ones, you will have to pack them in your checked bags. If you will be outdoors and depending on the season or destination, be sure to bring plenty of insect repellent.

6. Think Small for Toiletries.
If you are planning to stay at a vacation home that will require a shopping trip to stock up on essentials. Leave the shampoo and conditioners at home. Purchase them there. If it that isn't an option, travel size is your friend. Remember, all hotels and resorts will provide you with these essentials. Even toothpaste and toothbrushes, if you forget. As well as towels, so leave them at home. Most department stores sell TSA-approved clear bags with containers that you can fill with the products you already use at home. They are inexpensive and help you to take all of your essentials with you in the proper amounts.

7. Stock up on essentials.
If you have a baby that is still in diapers, make sure you bring as many as you will need. I never take the chance so, I pack enough diapers in our diaper bag and have enough diapers in both my partner and I's luggage. A good rule to follow is to pack double of what you normally use. For a baby or toddler's diaper bag, pack enough diapers you will need for the length of your flight and add 2.

Snacks for kids are also something to consider because most times, kids do not want to wait for their small complimentary snack from the airline. Snacks that are easy to bring are sandwiches, puffs or cereal and dried fruit or granola bars. I like using the containers that your child can reach inside to get their snack but can be tipped without making a mess. If you have a small baby, bring baby food if your destination does not offer them.

Make sure to make use of the side pockets for empty sippy cups or bottles, you will use these a lot during your whole trip. I like the Take N' Toss sippy cups because they are simple and can be stacked inside one another. If you need to bring breast milk or formula, bring it. I've brought it in bottles and the TSA screen it and I've never been given a problem.

If you are traveling with breast milk, bring an ice pack to make sure it doesn't spoil. If you are planning to pump, consider purchasing a travel pump that you can easily stow away in your carry-on. If you formula feed, you can opt for single pre-measured powdered formula packets and you do not need to declare it. Buy a bottle of water after you've passed the security check point and you will be set. Bring any diaper cream you will need, plastic bags for diaper disposal or if you have soiled clothes. Pack baby wipes, I usually bring a whole package of wipes in the diaper bag and pack another in a checked bag. That is usually enough for a 2 week vacation.

Bring a change of clothes for your child just in case of an accident and an extra shirt for you. Pack small toys to keep them busy and that can be stored away easily when they get bored. Lastly, I always pack one of their soft blankets for when they fall asleep or get chilly on a long plane ride.

8. Stay entertained.
Bring your gadgets and don't forget to pack your chargers. I use a cable wrap and neatly store everyone's cables and plugs in one central area. Don't forget an adapter if you are traveling to countries that use different outlets. Pack your camera in a travel bag, you can use this as a personal item and take it with you onto the plane with your carry-on. Don't forget extra batteries and camera cards. If you use film, bring extra, some countries don't have it readily available and it can get really pricey. I bring headphones for each family member and have my littlest use her iPad to watch a movie, read a book or play games and it makes the time pass. Headphones are also great to have to take advantage of any of the flight's entertainment or to purchase a movie for an older child.

9. Remember -- YOU.
As a parent, we often worry so much about getting our kids packed and prepared for what we hope will be a stress-free vacation. Don't forget about your essentials. Will you need a hair straightener? If so, consider bringing it and using a hair straightener travel case to minimize space use. Keep in mind that most hotels have hair dryers at your disposal.

Pack only the make-up you will use. I only pack one versatile eye shadow palette (one you can use for day time/night-time looks), eyeliner, eyebrow liner, waterproof mascara, foundation with SPF, blush, lip gloss and make-up remover wipes. Place all of your liquids in your clear TSA-approved bag. Your make-up brushes and pressed powders can be placed in a separate make-up bag along with cotton pads and q-tips. Pack your hair essentials such as bobby pins and elastics in a ziploc bag. If you have daughters, pack theirs with yours. For the gents, don't forget your combs/brushes, gels or hair glue and travel grooming kit.

Pack light clothes, t-shirts, tank tops, shorts and pants. Bring a formal outfit or two, in the case that there is a dress code at your resort or cruise. Choose a pair of shoes that are stylish and practical. I love using ballet flats or a lower strappy wedge because they are easy to pack and can be used both formally or casually. Men can bring polo shirts or tropical shirts with long pants. Unless you are traveling to a special event that requires heels, don't bring them. Same goes for the gents, don't bring your dress shoes unless you need to. If you are traveling to colder climates, layer your clothes and choose warm fabrics.

Don't forget your contact lenses and solution, any feminine hygiene items you may need, shaving gear, deodorant, perfume/cologne, lip balm, ear plugs, nail clippers and tweezers. Bring your journal or e-reader for down times. Pack a plastic poncho for each of your family members. These ponchos fold almost paper-thin and can be placed in the front pockets of your luggage and not take up any room inside your luggage. These are great for when you are at theme parks or on a hiking a trail and will allow you to walk around in the rain.

And definitely do not, I repeat, do not forget your bathing suit and camera!

10. Pack medicine.
If you are traveling with children or without, it's always best to prepare for anything. Bring travel-sized anti-nausea and anti-diarrheal medicine, pain and fever relief medicine and a small first-aid kit. Mole skin is a life saver when you will be doing a lot of walking and are at risk of blisters. Bring antibacterial wipes to wipe down anything questionable, I found that using these help to avoid getting sick during travel. Pack a travel size hand sanitizer to use whenever you need. Also, pack any prescription medication you need and leave them in their original packaging. Make sure to bring enough for the entire duration of your trip.

Last tip: If you are planning to stay at a vacation home, try to make time throughout your stay and as you go, to do your laundry. That way, at the end of your trip, all of your clothes will be clean and folded and packed away in your luggage. When you get home, unpacking will be super easy since your clothes is already laundered and folded. If this isn't an option, opt for a laundering service at your resort or hotel if your budget allows.

Ultimately, relax and roll with the punches. Accept that sometimes, if not a lot of the time, things that are out of our control happen. Things don't go as planned, luggages get lost, flights get cancelled or odd weather comes out of nowhere. Whatever it may be, just make sure you make the best of it.

Hopefully planning ahead will help a bit and most times spontaneity makes for great memories. With practice, packing gets easier and easier and results in a successful trip. Traveling doesn't have to be stressful, after all, family vacations are meant for incessant amounts of fun. Get out there and make memories and explore the world!

Loading Slideshow...
  • The Abandoned Flats In Keelung, Taiwan

    Little is known about these abandoned flats in Keelung, Taiwan. Even less is written about them in English. According to<a href="http://www.libertytimes.com.tw/2013/new/apr/5/today-north12.htm" target="_blank"> The Liberty Times</a>, a local newspaper in Taiwan, these flats were built in the '90s in anticipation of a housing boom. But the boom never came,<a href="http://www.propertyguru.com.sg/lifestyle/article/4/mysterious-places-keelung-taiwan" target="_blank"> the project ran out of money</a> and now the buildings sit forgotten.

  • Abandoned Train Depot In Czestochowa, Poland

    The town of Czestochowa, Poland isn't well-known to many train-enthusiasts. It's actually better known for religious pilgrimages thanks to the <a href="http://www.staypoland.com/about_czestochowa.htm" target="_blank">Jasna Gora Monastery and the icon of the Black Madonna</a>. Still that hasn't stopped travellers from stumbling across the town's forgotten tracks.

  • Château Miranda In Celles, Belgium

    It looks like a perfect setting for a horror movie, but the Château Miranda actually used to be<a href="http://www.abandonedplaygrounds.com/chateau-de-noisy-miranda-castle-decaying-and-abandoned-in-belgium/" target="_blank"> home to families and later, dozens of orphans in Belgium prior to 1991</a>. Since then it's been shut down, forgotten by the family who owns it.

  • Dadipark In Dadizele, Belgium

    Hard to believe this use to be a playground for kids, huh? The park was started by a Belgian pastor during the '50s and later evolved into a theme park. It was later plagued by a series of accidents involving visitors, eventually closed for renovations and <a href="http://www.abandonedplaygrounds.com/dadipark-amusement-park-where-child-is-king-abandoned-in-dadizele-belgium/" target="_blank">never managed to open back up again</a>, according to Abandoned Playgrounds.

  • Hashima Island, Japan

    Also known as "Gunkanjima" or "Battleship Island, this forgotten island sits off the coast of Japan in the Nagasaki Prefecture. It used to be home to a coal mining operation and at one point housed 5,259 people within the 6,100 square meters of liveable space. By 1974, the demand for coal had dropped to the point where the island was closed and the inhabitants asked to leave. In June, Google brought its street view technology to digitally map the area. You can <a href="http://www.hashima-island.co.uk/#" target="_blank">check it out here</a>

  • House Of The Bulgarian Communist Party In Mount Buzludzha, Bulgaria

    As the Soviet Union fell into disarray, so did the House of the Bulgarian Communist Party. On the outside, the building looks like a futuristic stone saucer perched above ground. Inside, the building's structure crumbles against years of exposure to the elements. According to the Daily Mail,<a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2117506/Monument-troubled-past-Inside-crumbling-communist-HQ-Bulgaria-afford-maintain-demolish.html" target="_blank"> Bulgaria's government doesn't have the 20 million dollars needed for repairs</a>. Until it does, the building will remain abandoned.

  • Kasteel Van Mesen In Lede, Belgium

    The Kasteel van Mesen underwent quite a few changes before being abandoned in the '70s. Prior to 1914, the building housed a wealthy family before it <a href="http://www.forbidden-places.net/urban-exploration-castle-of-mesen-lede#.UrDs2tJDvPo" target="_blank">later served as a boarding school just for girls</a> in Belgium, according to Forbidden Planet. A ban on French education in the area shut down the school where it lays forgotten.

  • Mirny Diamond Mine In Siberia, Russia.

    Located in the cold wastelands of Siberia, Russia, this diamond mine once produced 20 per cent of the world's diamonds and could churn out 10 million carats of diamond per year. With the fall of the Soviet Union, the mine changed ownership until it<a href="http://www.amusingplanet.com/2013/04/abandoned-mir-diamond-mine-in-russia.html" target="_blank"> finally shut down in 2004</a>, according to Amusing Planet.

  • The Ryugyong Hotel In Pyongyang, North Korea

    No one's sure why the Ryugyong Hotel earned the nickname the "Hotel of Doom" but it might be because of its menacing appearance (it could pass an an evil villain's fortress) or because the hotel's goals were so grand, the project was doomed to fail. Construction began in 1987 and nearly three decades later, the hotel still hasn't opened. Work has been on a start-stop schedule thanks to global tensions with North Korea and it doesn't look like the hotel will open any time soon.

  • Spree Park In Berlin, Germany

    Prior to shutting down in 2001, Spree Park's claim to fame was its giant, 45-metre wide Ferris wheel. The first signs of trouble showed up <a href="http://www.abandonedberlin.com/2010/04/spreepark-and-how-to-get-in.html" target="_blank">in 1989 when the park saw a decline in visitors</a>, according to Abandoned Berlin. Escalating prices and lack of parking sealed the deal and the park shut down to the public.

  • Villa Epecuén In Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    Rubble is all that remains of Villa Epecuén, a tourist town in Buenos Aires Province. The project did enjoy some success until a seiche (a standing wave) in the the salt-water lake of Lago Epecuén broke the dam and the dike protecting the town. Eventually the waters, reaching as high as 10 metres, destroyed the town and it was never rebuilt.

  • An Abandoned Nursing School In Ronse, Belgium

    On the outside, this a<a href="http://www.theverge.com/2013/12/15/5213418/gorgeous-batman-graffiti-discovered-inside-abandoned-nursing-school" target="_blank">bandoned school in Ronse, Belgium</a> looks like no's one paid a visit for decades. However, venture inside and you'll find the walls decorated in Batman-inspired grafitti, thanks to street artist <a href="http://www.fatcap.com/article/pete-one.html" target="_blank">Pete One</a>.

  • Up Next: Abandoned Canada

  • Uranium City

    One of the more famous ghost towns in Saskatchewan is Uranium City. It was close to achieving city status and then collapsed upon the closure of the Eldorado Mine and the mass exodus of its population. Today, <a href="http://arts.nationalpost.com/2012/03/22/uranium-city-is-small-town-canada-taken-to-the-extreme/" target="_blank">roughly 70 people inhabit the town in order to keep it alive</a>. Photo Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/cityofstrangers/" target="_blank">cityofstrangers</a>

  • White Otter Castle

    White Otter Castle near Atikokan, Ont. is a three-storey castle by Jimmy McOuat. An eccentric hermit, he built the castle between 1903 and 1915 as a dowry for a woman he wanted to marry. In 1918, McOuat drowned while fishing and is buried next to the castle. The property remains abandoned.

  • Bayer’s Lake Mystery Walls

    Bayer’s Lake Mystery Walls in Halifax, Nova Scotia is a mystery that has stumped Nova Scotians for decades. Located near the province's capital, these fortified stonewalls are unknown in origin, abandoned by someone hundreds, perhaps even thousands of years ago. The most logical explanation that’s often used is that it could have been a military installation. Photo Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/klandry/" target="_blank">darbycrashin </a>

  • Fort San

    Fort San, or the Fort Qu Appelle Sanitaruim, is a former sanitorium opened in 1917 to house tuberculosis patients. A self-sustaining village, it had its own power house, gardens, livestock and more. In the 1960’s, the building was used as the Saskatchewan Summer School of the Arts then the HMCS Qu'Appelle Cadet Summer Training Centre. In the 90’s,it was re-purposed as the Echo Valley Conference Centre, which was closed down in <a href="http://www.finance.gov.sk.ca/annreport/SaskatchewanPropertyManagementAnnualReport0405.pdf" target="_blank">2004</a>. See more photos <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdPvulWYlVU" target="_blank">here</a>

  • Giant Mine

    Just north of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories was a large gold mine discovered in 1935 by Johnny Baker. It wasn’t until 1944 that the mine’s massive gold deposits were discovered. From 1948 to 2004, the mine produced over 220,000 kgs of gold. In 2005, <a href="http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100027388/1100100027390" target="_blank">Miramar Giant Mine Ltd., the group responsible for maintaining the mine</a>, ditched their duties and the Giant Mine officially became abandoned. Miramar Giant Mine Ltd Photo Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/clinger/" target="_blank">Marke Clinger </a>

  • Val-Jalbert

    Val-Jalbert in Quebec, just 8km northwest of the town of Chambord, Que., was first built in 1901. Its location at the base of Ouiatchouan Falls allowed it to be a successful pulp mill for many years until it was suddenly closed in 1927 and the entire town was abandoned. All the remains are <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/73416633@N00/5825692739/sizes/z/in/photolist-9SNcug-9SSc77-9SPed4-9SNYC2-9SP98P-9SRGWh-9SRymC-9SPqwx-9SS6fC-9SNCdn-9SP336-9SRqSU-9SNTUp-9SRN9h-9SNVhD-9SShLb-9SNrcM-9SR5WL-9SNi78-9SNDGg-9SRctU-9SSuF9-9SS1Yq-9SSnqq-9SNx4R-9SPjdk-9SRkNu-9SRpz9-adf1KQ-9SPo8M-acUVhG-acUSJ9-acSkJX-dhJ7cN-e2Kb48-e2KcnH-e2Kb1H-e2QQ47-cA3E3u-dhJ62U-dhJ6zJ-dhJ76f-acS6r8-acUZqJ-acV6pS-acSgeZ-acV3oJ-acShbt-acV81E-acUXdS-acSaP6/" target="_blank">sixty well-preserved buildings.</a>

  • Ireland's Eye

    What was once a fishing village by Smith Sound, Trinity Bay in Newfoundland from the 1880's to the 1960's is now a ghost town. At its peak, the village's population was at 157. However by the mid 60's, the population fell to 16, all who later fled to nearby counties. There are rumours that the village proved to be a hiding ground for the drug caches of local gangsters during the 80's. For more photos, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YR91dMvKmSs&feature=youtu.be&t=4m25s" target="_blank">click here</a>

  • The Canada Malting Complex

    The Canada Malting complex in Montreal, Quebec was built in the early 1900’s and thrived for many years, outputting 250,000 lbs of malt per year. In 1980s, the factory became too small and the site was abandoned. Due to vandalism and weather, the factory now sits in a major state of disrepair, though its silo remain part of the <a href="http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/lhn-nhs/qc/canallachine/index.aspx" target="_blank">Lachine Canal National Historic Site</a>. Watch the full video <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEWSyx_9_3k" target="_blank">here</a>

  • Aspotogan Hotel

    Construction of the <a href="http://www.aspotoganseaspa.com/Default.aspx" target="_blank">Aspotagan Sea Spa</a> began in 1993 but just a year later, the project ran out of money. Even though it’s been 20 years, no new business opportunities has come up and the space continues to sit half-built, abandoned and unused on the South Shore of Nova Scotia between St.Margaret’s Bay and Mahone Bay.

  • Riverview Hospital

    The Riverview Hospital in Coquitlam, B.C. was first built as an asylum in 1913. Today its West Lawn site is completely abandoned making it so ideally creep that even "the X-Files" filmed an episode here. Photo Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/shoes_on_wires/" target="_blank">Shoes on Wires</a>

  • Alma College

    Alma College in St. Thomas, Ont. was a private school for girls built in 1878. In 1988, the school closed but grounds were still used until 1994 to teach primary school and music. From 1996 and onwards, the college traded hands several times, was gutted, fell into disrepair, was featured in the horror movie, "Silent Hill" until it was consumed by very mysterious fire in 2008. Today all that remains is the front gate and the chapel. Flickr: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/goaskaliceithinkshewillknow/" target="_blank">go ask alice . . .</a>

  • Mirabel Montreal Airport

    Originally named Montreal International Airport when it opened in 1975, Mirabel Airport was the largest airport in the world -- just in time for the 1976 Olympics in Montreal. It was meant to replace current-day Pierre Elliott Trudeau Airport however, due to its location, the airport’s use declined and its last commercial flight was in <a href="http://science.howstuffworks.com/engineering/structural/10-construction-projects5.htm" target="_blank">October 2004</a>. Today, the airport is used as a cargo airport and is a race car track. Click <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BsFQAAblL8" target="_blank">here</a> for more photos

  • Canol Heritage Trail

    Canol Heritage Trail in the Northwest Territories is a route that follows along an abandoned World War II pipeline. Stretching 358 km in the Mackenzie Mountains, the trail <a href="http://www.iti.gov.nt.ca/tourismparks/parks/parks/canol_trail_park.shtml" target="_blank">one of the most challenging hikes</a> in North America. On the route, there are relics from wartime construction which make for one-of-a-kind photo ops.

  • Halifax County Rehabilitation Centre

    Halifax County Rehabilitation Centre operated as a municipal and provincial facility from 1941 to 2002. Located in Cole Harbour, it was abandoned for many years, <a href="http://www.uer.ca/locations/show.asp?locid=25848" target="_blank">used as a film set for the show "Trailer Park Boys"</a>and eventually scheduled for demolition. In 2010, <a href="http://metronews.ca/news/halifax/59587/fire-guts-old-rehab-centre/" target="_blank">the centre caught fire</a>, leaving it even more of a shell of its former building. At the end of 2011, the centre was again set for demolition but was set back again due to contaminants. Photo Credit:<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/matturalistic/" target="_blank"> Matturalistic! </a>

  • The Town Of Kitsault

    Kitsault, B.C. has sat empty for nearly 30 years. Built in the 1970’s with the promise of being a thriving mining hub for minerals, it sat closer to the Alaskan border than any town. The town itself included 94 homes, 200 apartments, a hospital, mall, community centre and even a curling rink. Pictured here is the inside of one of the town's grocery stores. When stock prices for molybdenum (a metal used in the construction of steel) fell, the entire community evacuated, making it a ghost town. But this ghost town might have a second chance: in 2004 an entrepreneur bought the town for $5 million in cash. CBC reports that<a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/b-c-ghost-town-could-become-major-natural-gas-hub-1.1391052" target="_blank"> the town could be re-purposed as a hub for British Columbia's growing liquid natural gas infrastructure</a>. Click here to see <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVv8RoY_f14" target="_blank">more video and photos </a>

  • Up Next: Abandoned America

  • Abandoned America

    (PICTURED:Undisclosed prison) - These are the hauntingly eerie photos that capture a snapshot of history by documenting abandoned America and the decline of a superpower. Taken by Matthew Christopher, who lives in Philadelphia, the collection of photos show a variety of empty buildings in various states of decay. Some buildings appear untouched, with all of its furnishings absolute pristine, while others depict how nature has reclaimed the buildings and turned them into ruins.

  • Abandoned America

    (PICTURED: Cafeteria at undisclosed prison) - These are the hauntingly eerie photos that capture a snapshot of history by documenting abandoned America and the decline of a superpower. Taken by Matthew Christopher, who lives in Philadelphia, the collection of photos show a variety of empty buildings in various states of decay. Some buildings appear untouched, with all of its furnishings absolute pristine, while others depict how nature has reclaimed the buildings and turned them into ruins.

  • Abandoned America

    (PICTURED:Packard Motor car company) - These are the hauntingly eerie photos that capture a snapshot of history by documenting abandoned America and the decline of a superpower. Taken by Matthew Christopher, who lives in Philadelphia, the collection of photos show a variety of empty buildings in various states of decay. Some buildings appear untouched, with all of its furnishings absolute pristine, while others depict how nature has reclaimed the buildings and turned them into ruins.

  • Abandoned America

    (PICTURED:Cell blocks at undisclosed prison) - These are the hauntingly eerie photos that capture a snapshot of history by documenting abandoned America and the decline of a superpower. Taken by Matthew Christopher, who lives in Philadelphia, the collection of photos show a variety of empty buildings in various states of decay. Some buildings appear untouched, with all of its furnishings absolute pristine, while others depict how nature has reclaimed the buildings and turned them into ruins.

  • Abandoned America

    (PICTURED:Undisclosed retirement home) - These are the hauntingly eerie photos that capture a snapshot of history by documenting abandoned America and the decline of a superpower. Taken by Matthew Christopher, who lives in Philadelphia, the collection of photos show a variety of empty buildings in various states of decay. Some buildings appear untouched, with all of its furnishings absolute pristine, while others depict how nature has reclaimed the buildings and turned them into ruins.

  • Abandoned America

    (PICTURED:Undisclosed theatre) - These are the hauntingly eerie photos that capture a snapshot of history by documenting abandoned America and the decline of a superpower. Taken by Matthew Christopher, who lives in Philadelphia, the collection of photos show a variety of empty buildings in various states of decay. Some buildings appear untouched, with all of its furnishings absolute pristine, while others depict how nature has reclaimed the buildings and turned them into ruins.

  • Abandoned America

    (PICTURED:Abandoned hotel) - These are the hauntingly eerie photos that capture a snapshot of history by documenting abandoned America and the decline of a superpower. Taken by Matthew Christopher, who lives in Philadelphia, the collection of photos show a variety of empty buildings in various states of decay. Some buildings appear untouched, with all of its furnishings absolute pristine, while others depict how nature has reclaimed the buildings and turned them into ruins.

  • Abandoned America

    (PICTURED:Trolley graveyard) - These are the hauntingly eerie photos that capture a snapshot of history by documenting abandoned America and the decline of a superpower. Taken by Matthew Christopher, who lives in Philadelphia, the collection of photos show a variety of empty buildings in various states of decay. Some buildings appear untouched, with all of its furnishings absolute pristine, while others depict how nature has reclaimed the buildings and turned them into ruins.

  • Abandoned America

    (PICTURED:Undisclosed church) - These are the hauntingly eerie photos that capture a snapshot of history by documenting abandoned America and the decline of a superpower. Taken by Matthew Christopher, who lives in Philadelphia, the collection of photos show a variety of empty buildings in various states of decay. Some buildings appear untouched, with all of its furnishings absolute pristine, while others depict how nature has reclaimed the buildings and turned them into ruins.

  • Abandoned America

    (PICTURED:Cell blocks, Old Essex county jail, Newark, New Jersey) - These are the hauntingly eerie photos that capture a snapshot of history by documenting abandoned America and the decline of a superpower. Taken by Matthew Christopher, who lives in Philadelphia, the collection of photos show a variety of empty buildings in various states of decay. Some buildings appear untouched, with all of its furnishings absolute pristine, while others depict how nature has reclaimed the buildings and turned them into ruins.

  • Up Next: Abandoned Buildings From Around The World

  • The Last House On Holland Island (Maryland, United States)

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/baldeaglebluff/4640582389/lightbox/" target="_blank">Credit</a>

  • Christ Of The Abyss (Key Largo, The United States)

  • Wonderland Amusement Park (Beijing, China)

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/joebehr/6349796608/lightbox/" target="_blank">Credit</a>

  • Craco, Italy

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/44460990@N04/8544667633/" target="_blank">Credit</a>

  • The Wreck Of SS Ayrfield In Homebush Bay (Homebush Bay, Australia)

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mezuni/5494051818/lightbox/" target="_blank">Credit</a>

  • Kolmannskuppe Village, (Kolmanskop, Namibia)

    Once a rich mining town, the only inhabitant of this ghost town is the sand. <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/fiverlocker/3723551862/lightbox/" target="_blank">Credit</a>

  • The White Domes Of Cape Romano Island (Florida, United States)

    <a href="http://www.panoramio.com/photo_explorer#view=photo&position=108&with_photo_id=62469078&order=date_desc&user=3331444" target="_blank">Credit</a>

  • Pripyat Amusement Park (Pripyat, Ukraine)

  • Hirsau Abbey, (Calw, Germany)

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rehamalhelsi/3422401578/lightbox/" target="_blank">Credit</a>

  • Kalavantin Durg, (Panvel, India)

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/selvin/4862475003/lightbox/" target="_blank">Credit</a>

  • Belchite Village (Zaragoza, Spain)

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/maguisso/3282722912/" target="_blank">Credit</a>

 

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