Aboriginal Canadians

Canadians Need to Ask Big Questions About Our Society

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 07.03.2015 | Canada Politics
Craig and Marc Kielburger

A national election is months away, but campaigning has already begun. While party leaders talk issues of economy and security, no one is asking the big question: what kind of society do we want? Canada is no longer one of the top five countries for integrating immigrants, a European think-tank announced in May. For decades, we've heard that Canada is a "just society" -- based on equality and freedom for all upheld in laws. We've built our just society, but is Canada becoming a less compassionate one?

We all Need to Atone for Canada's Mistreatment of Aboriginals

Hon. Navdeep Bains | Posted 06.19.2015 | Canada Politics
Hon. Navdeep Bains

You simply cannot live in Canada and ignore the past. It's a pretty strong statement but reading the report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission into Aboriginal residential schools, that's the conclusion I've come to. The truth may be out but the reconciliation is going to take a while. So just as all Canadians share accountability for what is past, we also share a responsibility for making things better.

The Lasting Legacy of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

James Wilson | Posted 06.09.2015 | Canada Politics
James Wilson

As Cree youngsters in the north, we are taught the tradition of how to walk on the land and in the bush -- with each foot fall carefully and quietly placed so as not to disturb the food sources that have always meant the difference between thriving and starvation. When young people began returning from residential schools, it is fascinating that what struck those who lived off the land the most is that these "students" had to be taught how to walk all over again. Not with the harsh heel strike they had learned in the towns and cities but with the gentle foot fall of their early childhoods.

Closing the Gap Between Aboriginal Business Leaders and Corporate Canada

Jean Paul Gladu | Posted 05.07.2015 | Canada Business
Jean Paul Gladu

Last week, we hosted the first of two joint Summits in Vancouver between our organizations, The Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB) and The Canadian Board Diversity Council (CBDC). Both Summits focus on board governance, kick starting a critical national dialogue about the merits of strengthening these communication lines between Corporate Canada and aboriginal business leaders.

The Children of Canada's Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Are Forgotten

Obert Madondo | Posted 06.10.2015 | Canada Impact
Obert Madondo

The children of these women are almost forgotten. Our half-hearted national conversation on the ongoing racialized violence against stolen indigenous women barely acknowledges their existence. If there is even an estimate of the number of children affected, please let me know. And yet, the surviving children's loss is unimaginable. They lost mothers, sisters, aunts and cousins. You don't need to be a psychiatrist to understand that the grotesque violence aboriginal women suffer affects the mental integrity of the children they leave behind.

Powerful Photos From Rallies Seeking Justice For Cindy Gladue

The Huffington Post Canada | Chris Jancelewicz | Posted 04.03.2015 | Canada Alberta

Canadians came together Thursday to protest the acquittal of the man accused of murdering Cindy Gladue, an aboriginal woman from Edmonton. Protests...

Democracy in First Nations Communities Requires an Informed Electorate

Ravina Bains | Posted 02.20.2015 | Canada Politics
Ravina Bains

It is unclear why the Chiefs of these 44 communities are choosing to withhold this information from their electorate and Canadian taxpayers. It is particularly peculiar that two of these communities, Weenusk First Nation and Wuskwi Sipihk First Nation, previously published their audited financial statements and have now reversed course. That brings up the question: why are these 44 Chiefs afraid of an informed electorate?

Colonialism Causes Diabetes, and Other Things I Learned at the Indigenous Health Conference

Andreas Krebs | Posted 01.26.2015 | Canada Politics
Andreas Krebs

According to new research presented at the first Indigenous Health Conference last week, colonialism causes diabetes. Colonialism is alive and well throughout Canadian society, and the health care system is no exception. In fact, the health care system broadly speaking is a principal way that Canada continues to colonize Indigenous people.

We Need To Stop Seeing Indigenous Women As Worthless

Jesse Staniforth | Posted 12.06.2014 | Canada Impact
Jesse Staniforth

How do we make police, governments, institutions, and one another care more about Aboriginal women, even if they do things that some among us may find unseemly, like drinking, or using drugs, or selling sex? This is precisely the question that those demanding an inquiry into missing and murdered women hope to see answered. An inquiry would help us identify the culprits and, hopefully, stem this epidemic. Not just the epidemic of murder, but the epidemic of seeing Indigenous women as worthless.

Harper's "Action Plan" for Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women and Girls: No New Action

Hon. Carolyn Bennett | Posted 11.18.2014 | Canada Politics
Hon. Carolyn Bennett

The "Action Plan" tabled in the House of Commons this week does nothing new to actually "Stop the Violence" against indigenous women and girls. Unfortunately the Prime Minister sees the overwhelmingly disproportionate number of indigenous women and girls facing violence, who go missing or who are murdered, as nothing more than crimes that should be investigated by the police after they happen.

Harper: Missing Aboriginal Women Cases Not Of National Concern

Canadian Press | CP | Posted 08.22.2014 | Canada Politics

WHITEHORSE - Prime Minister Stephen Harper says police investigations, not a national inquiry, are the best way to deal with crimes involving missing ...

Vancouver's Model Is the Best Path Towards Solving Aboriginal Issues

Andreas Krebs | Posted 09.05.2014 | Canada Politics
Andreas Krebs

In the wake of the Vancouver motion, municipalities across the country now have a clear path laid out before them: building relationships and engaging respectfully leads towards reconciliation. But, Reimer cautions, there's a lot of groundwork to be done first. "I wouldn't have my opening salvo be a motion recognizing unceded territory. I think you'd want to have some process that led up to it.

A Tribe Called Red: 'Society Is Starting To View First Nations As People'

The Huffington Post Canada | Aaron Brophy | Posted 06.06.2014 | Canada Music

If it seems like you're seeing and hearing more indigenous Canadian musicians lately it's not an accident. Only a few short months ago Ian "DJ NDN...

Investigation Into Aboriginal Youth Homes Funding

CP | The Canadian Press | Posted 07.30.2014 | Canada Alberta

EDMONTON - An Alberta judge says there should be an investigation into whether funding for aboriginal youth in the child welfare system is less than f...

'Why Can't We Just Get the Money?'

CP | Tamsyn Burgmann, The Canadian Press | Posted 07.17.2014 | Canada Politics

VANCOUVER - Carla Robinson's mother was sexually abused as a child attending two Indian residential schools in British Columbia, but her father dodged...

The Only People Making Money Off the Seal Hunt Are Anti-Sealing Campaigners

Terry Audla | Posted 06.28.2014 | Canada
Terry Audla

I understand that PETA brings in about $30 million annually, the Humane Society of the U.S. collects more than $100 million and their executives make six-figure salaries. They and other groups like the International Fund for Animal Welfare are clamouring for this easy target. Who could blame them? After all, it is good money in a competitive charitable market.

Palestine Needs a Story of its Own

Diane Weber Bederman | Posted 03.17.2014 | Canada
Diane Weber Bederman

Nations have a narrative that explains their culture, their common shared experiences, beliefs, rituals, symbols and stories. Now the Palestinian people want a defined border for their nation. But, in my opinion, they don't seem to have a story, a narrative specific to them. They have been seconding the stories of others in an attempt to make one of their own.

Teaching Our Kids in the South About Our Kids in the North

Cathy Elliott | Posted 02.26.2014 | Canada Impact
Cathy Elliott

If I were to make a PSA about the difference between mainstream schools and northern Aboriginal schools, I would start with a shot of a classroom in the Ontario's south. I'm in a classroom in the Orangeville, Ontario area. I show them pictures, a bit of video, and talk about our students in Canada's Aboriginal Communities. I tell them to imagine the classroom they're in is actually in the north. They're drinking bottled water or their parents are boiling it for five minutes for safety. Their food is three to five times as expensive as in the south. They realize that, in the short time they've been on this planet, they have had so much.

Taxpayers Have Been Generous to First Nations

Mark Milke | Posted 02.16.2014 | Canada Politics
Mark Milke

Canada's taxpayers have been increasingly generous to Aboriginal Canadians over the decades, but that reality is not often the narrative one hears from selected First Nations leaders. Instead, the oft-stated opinion is that taxpayers should ante up ever more. A quick look at the numbers shows us why that view will always be tragically misinformed.

'See You In Court': An Expensive, Time-Consuming Wrong-Headed Strategy

Hon. Carolyn Bennett | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Politics
Hon. Carolyn Bennett

Last year the Conservative government spent more fighting Indigenous people in the courts than it spent going after tax frauds. From First Nations' child welfare to resource development, the government's response has been "see you in court." Who knew in 2011, when a government document listed Indigenous peoples as "adversaries" in terms of resource development, that this attitude would permeate every aspect of the Conservatives' approach when dealing with Aboriginal people? Prime Minister Harper's decision to abandon consultation and negotiation to drag Aboriginal issues through the courts is failing, costly, time consuming and undermines the honour of the Crown.

A Brighter Future Through Indigenous Prosperity: My Talk at TEDxToronto

Gabrielle Scrimshaw | Posted 11.06.2013 | Canada Impact
Gabrielle Scrimshaw

As the first Aboriginal woman to present at TEDxToronto, I shared with the audience how the tides are shifting in the Indigenous community in ways that affect all Canadians. Listen to my talk to learn why.

Happy Birthday to a Woman of Honour

Hon. David C. Onley | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Politics
Hon. David C. Onley

Mrs. Maryon Pearson, famously witty wife of Canada's 14th Prime Minister the Rt. Hon. Lester B. Pearson, once said: "Behind every successful man, stands a surprised woman." Mrs. Pearson disliked politics and the demands public service placed on her husband and family. I wish she could have met my wife.

Lisa Charleyboy's Mission to Empower Aboriginal Canadians [video]

Shannon Skinner | Posted 11.29.2013 | Canada Impact
Shannon Skinner

Lisa Charleyboy is a Toronto-based Aboriginal writer and blogger who is dedicated to inspiring and empowering other young Aboriginal people to follow their dreams. Her popular blog Urban Native Girl covers pop culture with an indigenous twist.

Taking the Long View on Aboriginal Education

Gabrielle Scrimshaw | Posted 11.24.2013 | Canada
Gabrielle Scrimshaw

In our culture, it is often said that it is easier to step where someone else has stepped before you. This rings true for career and leadership development. We need to continue to build pathways for Aboriginal people to develop and succeed in meaningful careers.

Christy Clark is 'Down With O.P.P.' : Other Provinces' Problems

Rachel Décoste | Posted 11.18.2013 | Canada British Columbia
Rachel Décoste

Christy Clark has weighed into Quebec's not-yet-debated, not-yet-modified, not-yet-voted, not-yet-implemented or enforced charter. B.C. has come a long way from the 1907 race riots. Many are proud of B.C.'s rich diversity, but there is still work to do. There have been sporadic deplorable acts of intolerance in B.C. during the Premier's tenure. Curiously, she wasn't compelled to comment on issues occurring in her own province: Indigenous slurs, neo-Nazi enclaves, racial profiling...