Canada Aboriginal

Reconciliation Will Not Be Realized Until We Live Up to Past Promises

Hon. Carolyn Bennett | Posted 06.12.2015 | Canada Politics
Hon. Carolyn Bennett

Seven years ago today, the Prime Minister stood in the House of Commons and delivered a poignant apology to the survivors of residential schools. The apology means nothing if all Canadians do not understand the history behind it. The Prime Minister has refused to deal with appalling gaps in health, education and economic outcomes, nor the deplorable living conditions in many aboriginal communities.

The Lasting Legacy of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

James Wilson | Posted 06.09.2015 | Canada Politics
James Wilson

As Cree youngsters in the north, we are taught the tradition of how to walk on the land and in the bush -- with each foot fall carefully and quietly placed so as not to disturb the food sources that have always meant the difference between thriving and starvation. When young people began returning from residential schools, it is fascinating that what struck those who lived off the land the most is that these "students" had to be taught how to walk all over again. Not with the harsh heel strike they had learned in the towns and cities but with the gentle foot fall of their early childhoods.

This Is My Truth, This Is My Reconciliation

Wayne K. Spear | Posted 05.28.2015 | Canada Living
Wayne K. Spear

Will Canadians learn anything of useful value from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada? Will they even be interested in doing so? These and other questions are on my mind as I prepare for the final closing events of the TRC, from May 31 to June 3.

Aboriginal Doctors' Program Beats Graduate Target 5 Years Early

CBC | Posted 05.23.2015 | Canada British Columbia

The UBC medical school has already reached its 2020 goal of 50 aboriginal graduates.

How Idle No More Lives on in Canada

Ken Coates | Posted 05.07.2015 | Canada Politics
Ken Coates

Idle No More is not gone. Far from it. This most unusual of movements -- lacking formal structure, operating without money, and without a clear strategy -- had transformed the country and aboriginal public affairs in myriad ways. It was a game-changer in Canadian public life. Its founders urged indigenous people to find and exercise their voice. And they did. Idle No More was not a failure and has not disappeared.

The Children of Canada's Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Are Forgotten

Obert Madondo | Posted 06.10.2015 | Canada Impact
Obert Madondo

The children of these women are almost forgotten. Our half-hearted national conversation on the ongoing racialized violence against stolen indigenous women barely acknowledges their existence. If there is even an estimate of the number of children affected, please let me know. And yet, the surviving children's loss is unimaginable. They lost mothers, sisters, aunts and cousins. You don't need to be a psychiatrist to understand that the grotesque violence aboriginal women suffer affects the mental integrity of the children they leave behind.

Powerful Photos From Rallies Seeking Justice For Cindy Gladue

The Huffington Post Canada | Chris Jancelewicz | Posted 04.03.2015 | Canada Alberta

Canadians came together Thursday to protest the acquittal of the man accused of murdering Cindy Gladue, an aboriginal woman from Edmonton. Protests...

Disputed Land Claims The Greatest Deterrent To B.C. Mine Investment

Ravina Bains | Posted 04.08.2015 | Canada British Columbia
Ravina Bains

If the government is serious about stimulating investor confidence in the mining sector, they need to address the land certainty question.

Is John A. Macdonald Really the Canadian Hero We Think He Is?

Lisa Jackson | Posted 03.14.2015 | Canada Politics
Lisa Jackson

This year, a Sir John A. Macdonald-inspired beer was launched to "celebrate the heritage and greatness of being Canadian" and mark his 200th birthday. Looking closer at the real history, should we celebrate Sir John A as a beloved Canadian hero?

In 2014, There Was Progress For Aboriginal People

Andreas Krebs | Posted 03.04.2015 | Canada Politics
Andreas Krebs

Canada's colonial reality means Aboriginal people here face challenges where non-Aboriginal people enjoy opportunities. But I believe that through the hard work of many activists, leaders, and thinkers, Canada is slowly decolonizing. In the spirit of optimism that rings in a new year, I'd like to focus on some of the events that signal this gradual shift, even while recognizing that, in the words of Justice Murray Sinclair, head of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, this work will not be completed in our lifetimes.

What Really Needs to Happen to Make the Ring of Fire a Reality

Chief Cornelius Wabasse | Posted 02.22.2015 | Canada Politics
Chief Cornelius Wabasse

If Ring of Fire development is to be successful, the question should not be whether the development is happening fast enough. It should be whether the process is taking place based on a foundation of recognition and respect for Webequie First Nation and the other Indigenous nations who call this land home. No longer can our Treaty be ignored and violated. New agreements cannot be reached while existing ones are treated as if they don't exist.

Colonialism Causes Diabetes, and Other Things I Learned at the Indigenous Health Conference

Andreas Krebs | Posted 01.26.2015 | Canada Politics
Andreas Krebs

According to new research presented at the first Indigenous Health Conference last week, colonialism causes diabetes. Colonialism is alive and well throughout Canadian society, and the health care system is no exception. In fact, the health care system broadly speaking is a principal way that Canada continues to colonize Indigenous people.

Judge To Decide If Aboriginal Girl Will Be Given Chemo

CBC | Posted 01.14.2015 | Canada Living

An Ontario judge is to decide today whether the Children’s Aid Society should intervene in the case of an aboriginal girl whose family removed her...

Aboriginal People Are on a Slow March To Second-Class Citizenship

Chief Shining Turtle | Posted 01.12.2015 | Canada Politics
Chief Shining Turtle

I want to tell you a story about discrimination. It is a story that has been told for years by people living on reserves like the one where I live. Now a document prepared by federal bureaucrats has been released that describes the yawning gaps between social services provided to Aboriginal people living on reserves and everyone else. We are experiencing a slow motion march towards second-class citizenship. We're talking about billions of dollars that are not being spent on education for children, healthcare for the sick, and clean drinking water for all -- just because people are unlucky enough to be Aboriginal. Aboriginal people on reserves are asking for comparable services as other Canadians. This is not too much to demand.

The Commercial Seal Hunt Must Be Stopped

Rebecca Aldworth | Posted 01.11.2015 | Canada Impact
Rebecca Aldworth

Commercial sealing advocates find it exceptionally difficult to win hearts and minds with the truth. Because the truth is an industrial scale, non-aboriginal slaughter in which defenseless seal pups less than three months of age are horribly beaten and shot to death for their fur. It is a wasteful kill, in which the carcasses are normally dumped at sea.

Polar Bear Ban-Wagon Targets Inuit Livelihoods

Terry Audla | Posted 12.30.2014 | Canada Impact
Terry Audla

Inuit live among polar bears. So it baffles me when well-meaning people who have never seen a polar bear outside a zoo or cruise ship or glass-walled buggy seek to impose rules to govern how Inuit interact with bears, to determine how we should engage in a cycle of life that has allowed both Inuit and polar bears to survive for thousands of years.

Canada Lost its Innocence Long Ago and Tried to Cover it Up

Dr. Lisa Tomlinson | Posted 12.27.2014 | Canada Politics
Dr. Lisa Tomlinson

After the shooting incident on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on October 22, many Canadians across the county wasted no time in expressing their "shock" and bewilderment at the alleged terrorist attack against Canada. What is more puzzling to me is not the attack itself, but people's naivete about Canada's supposed "innocence" and "civility."

You'd Care If The English Or French Language Disappeared

Khelsilem Rivers | Posted 12.02.2014 | Canada British Columbia
Khelsilem Rivers

According to a 2010 report, my heritage language is the third most endangered indigenous language in British Columbia. It is the language of this land that Vancouver currently resides on -- and today it has less than six fluent speakers alive in the world.

Attawapiskat Finally Has a Real School Again

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 03.05.2015 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

In the dead of winter, minus 40 degree winds whistled through gaps around doors and windows of the decrepit portables that made up the entirety of their school. Until this month, that was life in elementary school in Attawapiskat. After a 14-year wait, children in the remote northern Ontario First Nations community have a real school again.

Canadians With the Least Access To Dental Care Are in the Worst Pain

Paul Allison | Posted 11.24.2014 | Canada Politics
Paul Allison

Inequality in access to dental care is but one manifestation of the increasing inequalities in Canadian society and it needs to be addressed. With societal changes such as the increasing proportion of the population who are elderly and the decreasing proportion of the population with dental insurance, difficulty accessing dental care is only going to increase unless we start acting now.

Harper's "Action Plan" for Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women and Girls: No New Action

Hon. Carolyn Bennett | Posted 11.18.2014 | Canada Politics
Hon. Carolyn Bennett

The "Action Plan" tabled in the House of Commons this week does nothing new to actually "Stop the Violence" against indigenous women and girls. Unfortunately the Prime Minister sees the overwhelmingly disproportionate number of indigenous women and girls facing violence, who go missing or who are murdered, as nothing more than crimes that should be investigated by the police after they happen.

What I've Learned After a Decade of Researching Suicide

Jitender Sareen | Posted 11.10.2014 | Canada Living
Jitender Sareen

The death of comedian Robin Williams last month sparked a worldwide discussion about suicide, its underlying causes and how it might be prevented. And, with World Suicide Prevention Day taking place Sept. 10, the subject is certain to generate more debate as people seek to understand this important health issue. Having spent 10 years researching the subject while working as a professor of psychiatry, I believe there are things we can do as a community to tackle this problem. With that in mind, I thought it might be helpful to reflect on what researchers have learned over the years about strategies for preventing suicide.

Harper Lacks Compassion and Leadership When it Comes to the Safety of Indigenous Women

Hon. Carolyn Bennett | Posted 10.24.2014 | Canada Politics
Hon. Carolyn Bennett

Prime Minister Harper's dismissal of the growing over-representation of Indigenous women and girls as victims of violence, homicide and persons who go missing as isolated crimes to be investigated by police illustrates just how out of touch he is. Moreover, the callous tone of his remarks yesterday, and failure to show any empathy for the families and loved ones of those who have been lost, shows a lack of compassion and leadership.

Harper: Missing Aboriginal Women Cases Not Of National Concern

Canadian Press | CP | Posted 08.22.2014 | Canada Politics

WHITEHORSE - Prime Minister Stephen Harper says police investigations, not a national inquiry, are the best way to deal with crimes involving missing ...

This Aboriginal Case Should Help Dispel Colonial Attitudes

Andreas Krebs | Posted 09.17.2014 | Canada British Columbia
Andreas Krebs

The Supreme Court's ruling in the Tsilhqot'in Nation v. British Columbia case on Aboriginal rights and title exploded in the news last month. Whatever your opinion of the case, it's clear that this is not just about territory: it's also about Canada's evolving constitution -- a common law document whose roots stretch back to the Magna Carta.