Blackface

Kevork Djansezian via Getty Images

A Black James Bond: Advancement or Albatross?

Rumours have been swirling about a black James Bond for years. Mike Le of RaceBending.com believes people who think of themselves as "post-racial" will find a way to twist this theatrical racial reversal, arguing "with this particular event, you're no longer allowed to complain about racism." After the Emancipation Proclamation, people said "You're not allowed to complain because we freed the slaves." There is a contingent of concerned African-Americans who recoil the idea of giving autocrats a rope -- until they can ascertain who will ultimately be hanging from it. 
YouTube

WOW.

We've seen how the power of makeup can make people unrecognizable but a documentary put that to the test when they transformed a black family into white people. The doc "Dans la Peau d'un Noir" ("In a...
X17online.com

Not Everyone Who Wears Blackface on Halloween Is Racist

I'm a little tired of hearing about blackface costumes and how I should be offended by people who are obviously not racists. Context matters. Intentions matter. If a group of white dudes decide to dress up as a black-skinned Jamaican bobsled team, should I be offended? Why, because they aren't 'black' Jamaicans? Jamaica is a multi-racial country. I was at a bar once and this exact thing happened; I felt as thought I "had" to be offended even though, really, I didn't care and thought it was a funny costume. Perhaps in the new age, we need to find a term aside from "racist" to describe behaviour that is simply racially insensitive or stupid.

Blackface is a Black Eye to Canadian Values

One day we will all be in stitches, laughing together at the symbols which have lost their racist tone of yesteryear. Today, we are not there yet. Mario Jean's minstrel portrayal of a black person hurt members of the larger Franco-Canadian family. No one, not even the privileged members of the dominant culture, can deny it.
Wikimedia

Blackface Breakdown: Welcome To Race Relations In Quebec

Earlier this month Huffington Post blogger, Nydia Dauphin, wrote a post entitled, "Why The Hell Are Quebec Comedians Wearing Blackface?" She was referring to Mario Jean's "impersonation" of Boucar Diouf at the Gala des Oliviers, in which Jean used black makeup to portray Diouf. This would have been an opportune time to have a constructive dialogue concerning race relations in Quebec. Quite predictably, however, the discussion has resorted to accusations of overzealous political correctness on one side to indictments of overt racism on the other, which is simply indicative of the sad state of the discourse surrounding ethno-race relations in Quebec.
Getty Images

Challenging "Blackface" Is Not Quebec-Bashing

If the whites in Quebec who are donning blackface are claiming to have no prior knowledge of the practice, how and why exactly are they coming to partake so frequently in its disturbing revival? Are some commentators then claiming that some white people are born with an inherent desire to spontaneously paint their faces black to stereotype, dehumanize, and ridicule the physical characteristics of their fellow citizens? Most people are intelligent enough to deduce that blackface is a popular form that you no longer tend to see on TV or in film anymore for a reason.
Getty Images

You Can't Point Out Racism In Quebec

In an article reacting to my blackface blog post, I am accused of calling all Quebecers racist. Somehow, by sharing my thoughts and experiences as a Quebecer, I ceased to be one myself -- placed by this media outlet as a spiteful outsider to the only society, culture, and civic family I've ever intimately known.

Blackface Blunder Backfires at Université de Montréal

During Université de Montréal's Frosh activities, white students painted their faces with blackface makeup. It's important to highlight here that this behaviour is not representative of French Canadians, which is precisely why my first week at Université de Montréal was like being on the border of Bizarro World and Crazy Town.