Canadian History;

Black Church Scrubs Name Of Halifax Founder Who Was Accused Of Genocide

CP | Alison Auld, The Canadian Press | Posted 03.22.2017 | Canada

"Here's a church named after a man who attempted to exterminate another race of people of colour.''

Canada Should Rethink Praising This Tyrant From Its Colonial Past

Yves Engler | Posted 02.28.2017 | Canada Living
Yves Engler

Few are aware that a Montréaler played key role in expanding British colonial rule across Africa. Sir Édouard Percy Girouard rose to fame by helping Britain conquer Sudan.

Recognize That Black History Is Canadian History

Historica Canada | Posted 02.27.2017 | Canada Living
Historica Canada

For too long, the achievements of our community were rarely listed in text books, showcased in film, or shared with a wide audience. Black Canadians have come to expect their stories to be ignored in Canadian history.

Emma Paling

Cree Artist Depicts The 'Alternate Facts' Canada Desperately Needs

HuffingtonPost.com | Emma Paling | Posted 02.04.2017 | Canada

“I wanted to reflect on the last 150 years. What has it meant to indigenous people?”

Indigenous People Are Not The 'Ghosts Of History'

Len Flett | Posted 01.04.2017 | Canada Politics
Len Flett

Canadian indigenous people have been described as "ghosts of history," spectres lingering in the background, haunting our legacy. This refers to the fact that indigenous people have been ignored to a great extent in Canadian history, yet Canadians are fully aware that indigenous people were here long before the arrival of the Europeans.

The Vimy Foundation Brings The First World War To Life With Colour

Jeremy Diamond | Posted 11.10.2016 | Canada Politics
Jeremy Diamond

As is often said, a photo can be worth a thousand words. The Vimy Foundation is working to help bring a human face to Canada's First World War history. In honour of Remembrance Week.... the Vimy Foundation is launching a unique and innovative project to colourize rarely seen images of the First World War, a project aimed at reengaging young Canadians on defining moments in our history.

South Africa Renews Canadian Ties With Fort McMurray Aid

Rachel Décoste | Posted 05.30.2016 | Canada Alberta
Rachel Décoste

The deployment of wildland fire fighters to Fort McMurray is the biggest foreign deployment ever for South Africa (save armed forces' deployments). The South African PR machine casts the aid as "repaying a debt to the Canadian people for their support for the anti-apartheid struggle." It's an interesting re-interpretation considering Canada's weak anti-apartheid record and deteriorating diplomatic relationships with South Africa.

Meet Canada's Donald Trump: PM Robert Borden

Rachel Décoste | Posted 05.03.2016 | Canada Living
Rachel Décoste

As Canadians look down upon the severe tone of the Republican primary season, they might console themselves by saying: "We would never resort to that kind of hateful dialogue, and it would never work here -- in the multicultural haven that is Canada." Prime Minister Robert Borden might prove them wrong.

Sir Wilfrid Laurier And Canada's Sunny And Not So Sunny Ways

Jack Jedwab | Posted 02.23.2017 | Canada Politics
Jack Jedwab

From the late 19th century on, Laurier's sunny ways emerged as a euphemism for finding the political middle ground or compromise when addressing complex issues. The specific compromise in question was on the thorny issue of Catholic and French language education in Manitoba.

Remembering The Creator Of Modern Gossip Journalism

Will Straw, PhD | Posted 02.08.2017 | Canada Living
Will Straw, PhD

No one will be celebrating this, but 2016 marks the hundredth birthday of one of the most vicious show business gossip magazines ever published, edited by a Canadian named Stephen G. Clow. On his death, the US newspaper columnist Westbook Pegler called him "the originator of Saloon journalism." His colourful life can be used as a direct origin for the modern state of tabloid and celebrity journalism. So why don't more people know his story?

'In Flanders Fields' Connects Young Canadians With History

Jeremy Diamond | Posted 11.10.2016 | Canada Living
Jeremy Diamond

In a country that traditionally does not know its own history, young people are often identified as the main offenders. But this poem is different. It represents something that is ours. Written by a Canadian, learned by Canadians and recited by Canadians. The Vimy Foundation is calling on all Canadian schools to help pass the torch of remembrance by reciting In Flanders Fields.

Harper's Use of Fear as a Political Strategy Is Very Familiar

Adam Bunch | Posted 10.05.2016 | Canada Politics
Adam Bunch

"Fear is not a policy. It is not an election platform," Stephen Lewis, the former NDP leader, recently declared during a campaign speech. "Using fear to get power suggests a deep and abiding cynicism." It does. But it can also be an effective strategy. It has been for centuries. It distracts.

What Makes Canadians Proud? The Answer May Surprise You

CP | The Canadian Press | Posted 10.01.2016 | Canada Living

The national statistical agency says 87 per cent of respondents to the 2013 General Social Survey said they're proud to be Canadian.

Sharing Canadian History With The World, One Cartoon At A Time

The Huffington Post Canada | Rebecca Zamon | Posted 07.31.2015 | Canada Living

Who knew our most popular Canadian was a dinosaur?

Veteran Quebec Photographer Loses Up To 50,000 Images In Burglary

CP | The Canadian Press | Posted 07.15.2016 | Canada

Jacques Nadeau says they reflect nearly 40 years of history, including shots of Rene Levesque, Jacques Parizeau and Maurice Richard

A Sneak Peak Into The New Canadian Museum For Human Rights

Vacay.ca | Posted 10.22.2014 | Canada Travel
Vacay.ca

Dubbed "the world's most impressive human rights museum" by some, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights opens to the public on September 27. Here's a sneak peak at what to expect.

How the Harper Government Manipulates Canadian History

Stéphane Dion | Posted 10.15.2014 | Canada Politics
Stéphane Dion

We must pay tribute to the courage and sacrifices of our soldiers, past and present, and highlight their essential contribution to peace and democracy. But we must also highlight the other remarkable aspects of Canadian history. The 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation is almost here and its preparations are lagging. Mr Harper and his Heritage minister, Shelly Glover, seem unable to give the celebration a clear focus. There is room for concern that once again, they will be content with showcasing Canada's military feats and refuse to acknowledge everything else that has made our nation a source of hope and envy in the world.

This Canadian Stood Up to Racism Before Rosa Parks

Rachel Décoste | Posted 09.10.2014 | Canada Impact
Rachel Décoste

In the social context of Canada before the Quiet Revolution (1950s), before Viola Desmond's act of defiance (1946), before Rosa Parks triggered the United States' Civil Rights Movement (1955), Fred Christie stood up to institutional discrimination. A decade before the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1947), Fred Christie exhibited unimaginable courage and perseverance in asserting his civil rights. Though the judicial process did not deliver the desired result, Fred Christie remains a key instigator in Canada's journey towards the establishment of universal rights.

Komagata Maru Reminds Us How Lonely It Can Get When We Stop Letting Others In

Aarondeep Bains | Posted 07.23.2014 | Canada British Columbia
Aarondeep Bains

When I see the photo of the Sikhs on the decks of the Komagata Maru, I think of the ones trying so desperately to pry that door open on land. The ones who raised money that they did not have for legal fees, and who rowed out to feed the men aboard with food they scarcely earned. Their story, and reasons for helping those barred from entry is as old as our nation itself.

100 Years Later, Racist Chapter Still Unknown By Many

CBC | Posted 07.23.2014 | Canada British Columbia

Descendants of two B.C. residents, who were on opposite sides of the Komagata Maru story, are sharing their reflections today on the 100th anniversar...

The Monarchy Debate Is Missing a Piece of the Puzzle

Johanu Botha | Posted 07.13.2014 | Canada Politics
Johanu Botha

The question Canadians should ask as they continue to debate the monarchy in this country is: how to square the institutional benefits of a non-partisan Head of State with the monarchy's obvious democratic deficit?

Don't Be Too Quick To Praise John A. Macdonald

Bernie Farber | Posted 04.24.2014 | Canada
Bernie Farber

Sir John A. Macdonald was also a racist who disdained Chinese rail workers, the very same men who helped build his national dream, by imposing a discriminatory head tax on each of them. And it was Macdonald whose policies of forced starvation helped clear First Nations from the prairies in order to build that railway. Indeed, James Daschuk from the University of Regina argues quite cogently in his book Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation and the Loss of Aboriginal Life that Macdonald's starvation policies led to the deaths of thousands.

The Real Story of Canada's "Good Indian"

Allan Gregg | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada
Allan Gregg

In the orgy of celebration of the War of 1812, the true legacy of Shawnee warrior Tecumseh has been badly (and perhaps, conveniently) miscast. Far from being ignored, he is now being appropriated by white society and cast as a "good Indian" - brave, heroic, co-operative, and at the ready to do the bidding of his British brethren. He is being placed aside Issac Brock, and the Canadian militia as the great defenders of Canada. His historical role has been reduced to Laura Secord with a feather. A more thorough reading of Tecumseh's life and influence tells a very different story.

The Most Discriminatory Laws in Canadian History

Rachel Décoste | Posted 11.16.2013 | Canada Politics
Rachel Décoste

Québec's credo is "Je me souviens", which loosely translates to "I will remember". But there is never a bad time to appropriate this mantra in the rest of Canada, to understand where we've come from and appreciate how far we've come as the world's first nation to adopt a federal multiculturalism policy. To that end, here are some low-lights of Canadian history.

No One Hates on Canada Like a Canadian

D.K. Latta | Posted 09.28.2013 | Canada
D.K. Latta

Here's the hard truth: no one puts down Canadians with quite as much glee as Canadians themselves. This can range from Canadians who think they are being charmingly self-deprecating to conservatives who hate Canada for not being more American. Plus Canadians in one part of the country love to put down Canadians in other parts (and then use the inevitable backlash as a justification for their initial prejudice).