Disability

Children With ADHD Are Suffering Because of Lack of Awareness

Dr. Shimi Kang | Posted 08.31.2015 | Canada Parents
Dr. Shimi Kang

ADHD is not a recent phenomenon that you and I are witnessing for the first time, but instead it is something that has been often misunderstood, neglected, or taken too casually. It is of vital importance to understand that everyone can contribute towards spreading positive awareness about ADHD.

This Is What Being Hard of Hearing Is Like at the Movies

Jacki Andre | Posted 08.18.2015 | Canada Living
Jacki Andre

I am hard of hearing and rely on lipreading. Video can be difficult, for a variety of reasons, including camera angle, voice-overs, sound effects, accents, and animation. Every time captioning fails at the movies, I am reminded of my inability to participate in activities many Canadians take for granted. I feel belittled, squashed, unimportant.

3 Things You Need to Know About Autism in Canada

Kathleen O’Grady | Posted 07.31.2015 | Canada Politics
Kathleen O’Grady

Many organizations and affected families across the country have been calling for a national autism strategy. The wide range in disparity of publicly funded services for autism across the country has even generated a kind of "medical migration" with several published accounts of families leaving their home provinces (most commonly, Atlantic provinces, Ontario and Quebec) to move to Alberta or British Columbia where autism services are more readily available and/or more flexible. It is also no longer uncommon to find Canadian families using crowdsourcing campaigns to fund their children's autism and related therapies.

Canada Needs a National Strategy for Unpaid Caregivers

Nicole F. Bernier | Posted 08.10.2015 | Canada Politics
Nicole F. Bernier

The impacts of informal caregiving commitments do not remain confined to the home: they are felt in the Canadian workplace and reduce productivity. They translate into 2.2 million hours of reduced effort in the workplace every week and cause an estimated $1.3 billion productivity loss annually, says the report.

Assisted Suicide Policy Needs to Account for the Human Ability to Overcome

Harvey Max Chochinov | Posted 05.26.2015 | Canada Politics
Harvey Max Chochinov

Human beings are not good at predicting how they will react in circumstances that have yet to unfold. Those of us working in healthcare understand that life-altering illness, trauma or anticipation of death can sometimes sap the will to live. In those instances, healthcare providers are called upon to commit time; time to manage distress, provide unwavering support and to assuage fear that patients might be abandoned to their hopelessness and despair. That is the essence of how medicine has traditionally responded to suffering. Stopping time by way of arranging the patient's death has never been part of that response.

10 Things Parents Of Kids With Special Needs Want You To Know

The Huffington Post Canada | Anchel Krishna | Posted 05.04.2015 | Canada Parents

My three-year-old-daughter has cerebral palsy. Having a child with special needs means a whole new set of ground rules. And for those parents who don'...

How a Person Who Is Hard of Hearing Listens to Music

Jacki Andre | Posted 04.04.2015 | Canada Living
Jacki Andre

While my hearing is pretty bad, I can hear some things and am not considered clinically deaf. I had a CAT scan in my early 20s, which showed that my cochleas didn't completely form. My diagnosis is "profound hearing loss." Loud, deep noises are my friends. I've never heard a bird sing. I can't hear the kettle whistle or the doorbell ring.

Disability and Debt: When One Happens to Canadians, the Other Follows

Jeffrey Schwartz | Posted 04.02.2015 | Canada Business
Jeffrey Schwartz

Many Canadians are well aware that a disability could occur at any time. Ninety-six per cent of us believe it, according to a recent RBC survey. The same survey showed that more than three-quarters of us also believe that missing three months of work, due to disability, would put us in serious financial jeopardy. Here are some steps you can take to prepare yourself for a possible disability.

Why Obesity Shouldn't Be Considered a Disability

Bill Bogart | Posted 03.08.2015 | Canada Living
Bill Bogart

Obese people, perhaps especially women, face a lot of discrimination. A question that is increasingly asked is whether they should be legally protected from acts of prejudice. Shouldn't people who are obese be judged on their merits with regard to jobs, education, health care etc. and not on their size? As we discuss what should be the legal approach to bias against obese people, let's also change our attitudes. Let's salute nutritious eating/drinking and physical activity for everyone. But let's not allow the size of people to dominate our judgment of them. The Jazzercise instructor had it right: it's time to assess everyone "on my merits, not my measurements".

Let's Stop Saying: "We Don't Care, as Long as our Baby's Healthy"

Sarah Sahagian | Posted 02.16.2015 | Canada Living
Sarah Sahagian

Ultimately, the refrain, "as long as they're healthy," makes it seem like individuals who are less healthy are less valuable and less loveable. In short, it's just a mean and untrue thing to say, so please, let's stop saying it.

What it's Like for Disabled and Elderly People to Take the TTC

Neil Seeman | Posted 01.07.2015 | Canada Impact
Neil Seeman

You know that feeling when you're hurried to get to work or an appointment downtown but the subway trains are all packed? So you fidget with angst until a less jam-packed car zooms into the station? Now, multiply that stress by 20 times. That's what it feels like to be a disabled man or woman waiting for a subway train in Toronto, at any time of day.

The Fight for Disabled Rights Has Gone on Too Long

Leah Morrigan | Posted 12.14.2014 | Canada Impact
Leah Morrigan

Though the movement for disabled rights began in earnest in the early 1900s, it wasn't until the mid-century civil rights movement that this group made great gains. Sadly, one in five disabled people worldwide still experience difficulties, but hope reigns eternal.

The Reliable Living Centre Is Making Dreams Come True

Eva Zatrak | Posted 10.29.2014 | Canada Living
Eva Zatrak

Many Canadians are in need of mobility options. I work in the community with a lot of seniors, but it is not strictly seniors that need assistance. With many individuals struggling within their own homes, it's refreshing to see the selection and level of innovation. Such is the newly opened the ReliAble Living Centre.

Ontario Should Consult People With Disabilities Before Making Laws to Protect Them

Andrew Morrison-Gurza | Posted 09.27.2014 | Canada Politics
Andrew Morrison-Gurza

In 2005, the Province of Ontario enacted the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. The thing that is missing from the AODA (in my opinion) is the lived experience of Ontarians with disabilities.

Helping Children With Disabilities Around the World

Debbie Wolfe | Posted 02.02.2014 | Canada Impact
Debbie Wolfe

On the International Day of People with Disability, December 3, World Vision notes that an estimated 98 per cent of children with disabilities worldwide are excluded from education. Many of these children are also hidden away due to stigma and shame.

Reimagining Accessibility: Competition Results and Lessons Learned

Hon. David C. Onley | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Politics
Hon. David C. Onley

The quest for a more inclusive accessibility symbol continues. The re-worked designs will be featured at next year's DEEP Conference -- which will be held in conjunction with The Accessibility Conference hosted by Guelph University -- for the delegates' input.

The Wheelchair Is Just One Small Part of the Picture: Why It's Time to Reimagine Accessibility

Hon. David C. Onley | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Impact
Hon. David C. Onley

The nub of my and others' unease with the current International Symbol of Access is that it excludes over 97 per cent of people with disabilities, because it is all about wheelchairs, rather than accessibility. To those who fear that the competition I've launched is aimed at throwing the proverbial baby out with the bathwater and getting rid of the wheelchair symbol altogether: this is definitely not the case. What I'm asking is for designers to reimagine the concept of accessibility and to come up with a revised symbol or set of symbols that will be more inclusive.

Reimagining Accessibility and the Wheelchair Symbol

Hon. David C. Onley | Posted 11.27.2013 | Canada Impact
Hon. David C. Onley

In 1969, the universal symbol for accessibility -- a blue square overlaid in white with the stylized image of a figure in a wheelchair -- made its first appearance. But the symbol is still built around a stick figure -- not a person. But the most important problem with the International Symbol of Access is this: it is exclusionary. The symbol is all about the wheelchair -- even though the majority of disabilities are not mobility-related. That is why, with the enthusiastic co-operation of the Ontario College of Art and Design University, I have launched an international competition to find a contemporary symbol.

Teaching Children About the "Ability" in Disability

Lindsey Athias | Posted 08.07.2013 | Canada Impact
Lindsey Athias

In order to embrace the ways in which others are different we have to realize the ways in which we are also the same. When it comes to teaching our children about kids with disabilities, the notions of "connectedness" and "sameness" are essential and something we must foster as a society.

How Do We Teach Children About the 'Ability' in 'Disability?'

Lindsey Athias | Posted 08.06.2013 | Canada Impact
Lindsey Athias

In order to embrace the ways in which others are different we have to realize the ways in which we are also the same. When it comes to teaching our children about kids with disabilities, the notions of "connectedness" and "sameness" are essential and something we must foster as a society.

Empowering Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Adam Moscoe | Posted 07.31.2013 | Canada Impact
Adam Moscoe

The launch of synapsABILITY -- a social venture that will evolve into a digital platform connecting individuals with disabilities and the support networks that care for them -- promises to bring the power of social media to an increasingly cash-strapped system of care.

Are You Deducting All You Can This Tax Season?

Cleo Hamel | Posted 06.05.2013 | Canada Business
Cleo Hamel

even with only one or two slips, you should still be aware of the deductions you can claim. And even if you don't claim them on your 2012 return, they could help next year. And that's what paying attention to these overlooked deductions is about: keeping a little more money in your pocket.

ChangeMaker: Don't Call Him Disabled

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 03.02.2013 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

During his 22 years at CityTV, David Onley was an anchor, producer, science and technology specialist and weatherman. He was also Canada's first senior newscaster with a visible disability. Having lived with polio and post-polio syndrome since the age of three, he has broken down many social barriers. He has worked tirelessly to improve accessibility for all.

Tis the Season to Give. Here's Why! #WhatWouldYouGive

Amber Rehman | Posted 02.26.2013 | Canada Impact
Amber Rehman

In late November TELUS asked their Facebook friends a simple question; if you could give anything to anyone, what would you give? To give is one thing, but to involve the average person and allow them to be part of the sharing is a beautiful thing.

I Still Want to Be Like Mike

Amber Rehman | Posted 01.07.2013 | Canada Living
Amber Rehman

I was in Grade five when I fell in love with basketball. Michael Jordan fuelled my over-the-top obsession with the sport. Being a kid with a disability didn't stop me from dreaming of dunking or playing one on one with Michael Jordan. Defying people's expectations has been one of my missions in life.