Canada Education

Why Kids Today Need Nature Literacy

Dan Kraus | Posted 11.22.2014 | Canada Impact
Dan Kraus

I worry a lot about how we don't understand nature anymore. Now I'm not talking about the value of nature or the importance of conservation. That worries me too, but what I'm talking about is the basic understanding of the plants and animals that co-exist with us. I'll call this nature literacy.

Makes Me Wonder: Nature Firsts

The Nature Conservancy of Canada | Posted 11.21.2014 | Canada
The Nature Conservancy of Canada

I have a lot of faith in curiosity and wonder, believing in their ability to inspire across disciplines and across all ages. When it comes to the na...

5 Things You Can Do to Reduce Your Risk of Colon Cancer

Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre | Posted 11.11.2014 | Canada Living
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Canada, with the incidence of colorectal cancer in Ontario one of the highest globally. Sobering statistics. What can you do to reduce your risk?

Dear Teacher, Thank You for Taking the Time to Really See Me

Lori Gard | Posted 11.17.2014 | Canada Living
Lori Gard

Dear Teacher: You called after me today. I was frustrated. Angry. Tired and lonely. And I didn't want to hear someone tell me for the bazillionth time all that I had done wrong. Tell me how I had been a bully. A bad boy. The truth is: I know. I know I am a bully. I have a hard time making friends because I'm different. But you took the time.

The Gift of Radio for Children Facing Ebola

Debbie Wolfe | Posted 11.03.2014 | Canada Impact
Debbie Wolfe

I feel so encouraged that radio is providing comfort to children in Sierra Leone during the Ebola crisis. In partnership with the country's government, World Vision is helping children continue their schooling by broadcasting educational programs for kids hunkered down at home.

Students Need an Education on Their Own Credit Scores

Ashley Redmond | Posted 10.30.2014 | Canada Business
Ashley Redmond

It's time for students to take control of their finances, and the first step in doing that is becoming more knowledgeable. Melissa Jarman, director of student banking at RBC, says there's a lot of work that needs to be done to improve financial knowledge.

'Entrepreneur' Is Not a Dirty Word

Kelly Lovell | Posted 10.28.2014 | Canada Business
Kelly Lovell

If you are an entrepreneur, be proud to hold this title and live up to its name. Also understand that you are leading a long overdue generational shift across sectors and it will take some time before your path may be embraced by all. Don't let the resistance discourage you from your ambitions.

Canada Needs a Grade A School System

Malkin Dare | Posted 10.24.2014 | Canada Living
Malkin Dare

First, the PISA standing of Canadian students has been dropping over the years, both in terms of raw scores, and also in terms of comparative scores. Our students are getting lower marks than they did in the past -- at a time when a number of other countries are dramatically improving their scores and rocketing past Canada.

The Problem with School: We Only Teach the Mind

Lori Gard | Posted 10.17.2014 | Canada Living
Lori Gard

I think most would agree that these are worthwhile endeavours for learning, both in the kindergarten classroom and beyond. Yes, literacy proper and numeracy proper are valued here, but these ideals are not everything we believe is important for learning.

We Can Create New Realities for Girls

Rosemary McCarney | Posted 10.16.2014 | Canada Impact
Rosemary McCarney

In a new global report conducted by Plan entitled Hear Our Voices, we spoke with more than 7,000 adolescent girls and boys from 11 countries in Asia, Africa, Central and South America. We wanted to learn more about what issues and concerns adolescent girls faced and how boys felt about those issues too.

Why We Should Empower Youth With Epilepsy Education

Epilepsy Ontario | Posted 10.14.2014 | Canada Impact
Epilepsy Ontario

Last spring, I joined my daughter Journey's fifth grade class as a volunteer on her field trip. I had the pleasure of watching a classmate approach Journey who was taking photos of a museum exhibit. The classmate suggested she turn off the camera flash; he was concerned that it could trigger one of her seizures. I was overcome with pride and appreciation for the caring, supportive community we have created in partnership with the school administration.

Why Do Schools Implement These Ridiculous Rules?

Danielle S. McLaughlin | Posted 10.11.2014 | Canada Living
Danielle S. McLaughlin

A rule that has an unclear or ridiculous purpose is, on its face, unfair. A rule that cannot possibly achieve its purpose is pointless. A rule that has more negative than positive effects is unfair and undemocratic. Discipline or punishment that does not address the behaviour it purports to correct is tyrannical.

International Day of the Girl Child Is About Empowering Girls

Sabrina Rubli | Posted 10.10.2014 | Canada Impact
Sabrina Rubli

On October 11, 2014, the world will celebrate International Day of the Girl Child. Adolescent girls are among the world's most vulnerable populations, and face a slew of unique and very real challenges. The international community needs to recognize that an empowered woman is the most effective catalyst for sustainable change, and it starts when they are teenagers. Protecting young women from violence increases their odds of completing school, and pursuing a successful and meaningful career!

Let Your University Education Speak For Itself

Bonnie M. Patterson | Posted 10.08.2014 | Canada
Bonnie M. Patterson

Of those who did respond in 2013, 87.4 per cent said they were employed six months after graduation, with 93 per cent on average reporting they were in jobs after two years. In many programs, employment rates were as high as 95 per cent two years out.

This World Teachers' Day: Reflecting on the Power of a Great Teacher

Jennifer Pellegrini | Posted 10.05.2014 | Canada Living
Jennifer Pellegrini

Mrs. Szathmary's patience with those of us for whom sports didn't come naturally was endless. She would examine gymnastic routines over and over and over again, offering guidance, support and recommendations on how to do it just a little bit better. Have you had a teacher who changed your life?

Carve Out Time to Talk Money With Your Kids This Thanksgiving

Melissa Jarman | Posted 10.04.2014 | Canada Business
Melissa Jarman

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, many students and parents are about to have their first holiday meal together since post-secondary school began about six weeks ago. For students, it has been a crash course in time and money management, and one thing is almost certain: there's never enough of either. This Thanksgiving, parents and students should carve out some time to talk finances and revisit the budget to determine if spending is on track.

Why It's Bad When a Country's GDP Grows More Than the Income of Its People

Salman Sakir | Posted 10.03.2014 | Canada Politics
Salman Sakir

As a country becomes richer and some people are left behind, guaranteed minimum income may help to alleviate issues like poverty and reduce inequality. Government policies to create more full-time work that pay decent wages could be an effective policy.

Despite All Their Benefits, RESPs Are Underused in Canada

Coreen T. Sol, CFA | Posted 10.03.2014 | Canada Business
Coreen T. Sol, CFA

The Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) has become the most underused, yet indispensable tax shelters designed to make post secondary education more accessible to children and grandchildren. Unfortunately, many of us don't use the RESP and if we do, we typically don't maximize the benefits available.

Four Things I've Learned About Being a Teacher

Lori Gard | Posted 10.03.2014 | Canada
Lori Gard

I am a writer who happens to be a teacher. In the wee hours of the night, after the dust of the day has settled, I write about love, care and compass...

Annoyed at Your Homework? A Girl in Kenya Will Change Your Mind

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 09.29.2014 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

When the students at Kisaruni All-Girls Secondary School in rural Kenya had the opportunity to set their school hours, they pushed the limits. The girls begin their studies each morning at 4:45 a.m. and end at 10 p.m., with classroom instruction from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The grumbling resentment toward schoolwork that typifies the North American high-school experience seemed, well, positively lame, compared to the Kenyan girls' fierce dedication to learning.

Attawapiskat Finally Has a Real School Again

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 11.25.2014 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

In the dead of winter, minus 40 degree winds whistled through gaps around doors and windows of the decrepit portables that made up the entirety of their school. Until this month, that was life in elementary school in Attawapiskat. After a 14-year wait, children in the remote northern Ontario First Nations community have a real school again.

Nigeria's Optimism Amid Ebola's Threat

Neil Seeman | Posted 11.23.2014 | Canada Impact
Neil Seeman

Optimism resides in Nigeria, despite the potential horrors of Ebola's global spread. Why so? As of September 23, the Centers for Disease Control has 21 confirmed cases with eight deaths in Nigeria from Ebola. That number is low. This is, in part, because childhood education is essential to the rising Nigerian economy.

Why Learning Outside in Nature Is Good for Teachers and Students

David Suzuki | Posted 11.17.2014 | Canada
David Suzuki

Despite all the benefits for students and educators, moving classes outdoors can be daunting. Teachers cite a host of barriers, from parental concerns to lack of time, confidence and support from administration. So how can a teacher ease in (or jump right in) to teaching outside?

STEM: It's a "Girl Thing," Too

G(irls)20 | Posted 11.16.2014 | Canada Impact
G(irls)20

Women make up over half of the world's population but only a third of engineering jobs across the globe are held by women. I believe this problem, like many others, is significantly centered on mindset and perceptions.

Why American Universities Are So Alluring To Asian Students

Ranjani Iyer Mohanty | Posted 11.08.2014 | Canada
Ranjani Iyer Mohanty

The number of foreign students has doubled since even 2000. Some 265,000 go to Canada, over 200,000 to Australia, and more than 420,000 to the UK. While the American empire may be in decline, its universities still hold a great allure for the youth of the world for their academic leadership, freedom to explore and create and share, and their inviting and equitable atmosphere.