Canada Education

The Problem with School: We Only Teach the Mind

Lori Gard | Posted 10.17.2014 | Canada Living
Lori Gard

I think most would agree that these are worthwhile endeavours for learning, both in the kindergarten classroom and beyond. Yes, literacy proper and numeracy proper are valued here, but these ideals are not everything we believe is important for learning.

We Can Create New Realities for Girls

Rosemary McCarney | Posted 10.16.2014 | Canada Impact
Rosemary McCarney

In a new global report conducted by Plan entitled Hear Our Voices, we spoke with more than 7,000 adolescent girls and boys from 11 countries in Asia, Africa, Central and South America. We wanted to learn more about what issues and concerns adolescent girls faced and how boys felt about those issues too.

Why We Should Empower Youth With Epilepsy Education

Epilepsy Ontario | Posted 10.14.2014 | Canada Impact
Epilepsy Ontario

Last spring, I joined my daughter Journey's fifth grade class as a volunteer on her field trip. I had the pleasure of watching a classmate approach Journey who was taking photos of a museum exhibit. The classmate suggested she turn off the camera flash; he was concerned that it could trigger one of her seizures. I was overcome with pride and appreciation for the caring, supportive community we have created in partnership with the school administration.

Why Do Schools Implement These Ridiculous Rules?

Danielle S. McLaughlin | Posted 10.11.2014 | Canada Living
Danielle S. McLaughlin

A rule that has an unclear or ridiculous purpose is, on its face, unfair. A rule that cannot possibly achieve its purpose is pointless. A rule that has more negative than positive effects is unfair and undemocratic. Discipline or punishment that does not address the behaviour it purports to correct is tyrannical.

International Day of the Girl Child Is About Empowering Girls

Sabrina Rubli | Posted 10.10.2014 | Canada Impact
Sabrina Rubli

On October 11, 2014, the world will celebrate International Day of the Girl Child. Adolescent girls are among the world's most vulnerable populations, and face a slew of unique and very real challenges. The international community needs to recognize that an empowered woman is the most effective catalyst for sustainable change, and it starts when they are teenagers. Protecting young women from violence increases their odds of completing school, and pursuing a successful and meaningful career!

Let Your University Education Speak For Itself

Bonnie M. Patterson | Posted 10.08.2014 | Canada
Bonnie M. Patterson

Of those who did respond in 2013, 87.4 per cent said they were employed six months after graduation, with 93 per cent on average reporting they were in jobs after two years. In many programs, employment rates were as high as 95 per cent two years out.

This World Teachers' Day: Reflecting on the Power of a Great Teacher

Jennifer Pellegrini | Posted 10.05.2014 | Canada Living
Jennifer Pellegrini

Mrs. Szathmary's patience with those of us for whom sports didn't come naturally was endless. She would examine gymnastic routines over and over and over again, offering guidance, support and recommendations on how to do it just a little bit better. Have you had a teacher who changed your life?

Carve Out Time to Talk Money With Your Kids This Thanksgiving

Melissa Jarman | Posted 10.04.2014 | Canada Business
Melissa Jarman

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, many students and parents are about to have their first holiday meal together since post-secondary school began about six weeks ago. For students, it has been a crash course in time and money management, and one thing is almost certain: there's never enough of either. This Thanksgiving, parents and students should carve out some time to talk finances and revisit the budget to determine if spending is on track.

Why It's Bad When a Country's GDP Grows More Than the Income of Its People

Salman Sakir | Posted 10.03.2014 | Canada Politics
Salman Sakir

As a country becomes richer and some people are left behind, guaranteed minimum income may help to alleviate issues like poverty and reduce inequality. Government policies to create more full-time work that pay decent wages could be an effective policy.

Despite All Their Benefits, RESPs Are Underused in Canada

Coreen T. Sol, CFA | Posted 10.03.2014 | Canada Business
Coreen T. Sol, CFA

The Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) has become the most underused, yet indispensable tax shelters designed to make post secondary education more accessible to children and grandchildren. Unfortunately, many of us don't use the RESP and if we do, we typically don't maximize the benefits available.

Four Things I've Learned About Being a Teacher

Lori Gard | Posted 10.03.2014 | Canada
Lori Gard

I am a writer who happens to be a teacher. In the wee hours of the night, after the dust of the day has settled, I write about love, care and compass...

Annoyed at Your Homework? A Girl in Kenya Will Change Your Mind

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 09.29.2014 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

When the students at Kisaruni All-Girls Secondary School in rural Kenya had the opportunity to set their school hours, they pushed the limits. The girls begin their studies each morning at 4:45 a.m. and end at 10 p.m., with classroom instruction from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The grumbling resentment toward schoolwork that typifies the North American high-school experience seemed, well, positively lame, compared to the Kenyan girls' fierce dedication to learning.

Attawapiskat Finally Has a Real School Again

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 09.25.2014 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

In the dead of winter, minus 40 degree winds whistled through gaps around doors and windows of the decrepit portables that made up the entirety of their school. Until this month, that was life in elementary school in Attawapiskat. After a 14-year wait, children in the remote northern Ontario First Nations community have a real school again.

Nigeria's Optimism Amid Ebola's Threat

Neil Seeman | Posted 09.23.2014 | Canada Impact
Neil Seeman

Optimism resides in Nigeria, despite the potential horrors of Ebola's global spread. Why so? As of September 23, the Centers for Disease Control has 21 confirmed cases with eight deaths in Nigeria from Ebola. That number is low. This is, in part, because childhood education is essential to the rising Nigerian economy.

Why Learning Outside in Nature Is Good for Teachers and Students

David Suzuki | Posted 09.17.2014 | Canada
David Suzuki

Despite all the benefits for students and educators, moving classes outdoors can be daunting. Teachers cite a host of barriers, from parental concerns to lack of time, confidence and support from administration. So how can a teacher ease in (or jump right in) to teaching outside?

STEM: It's a "Girl Thing," Too

G(irls)20 | Posted 09.16.2014 | Canada Impact
G(irls)20

Women make up over half of the world's population but only a third of engineering jobs across the globe are held by women. I believe this problem, like many others, is significantly centered on mindset and perceptions.

Why American Universities Are So Alluring To Asian Students

Ranjani Iyer Mohanty | Posted 09.08.2014 | Canada
Ranjani Iyer Mohanty

The number of foreign students has doubled since even 2000. Some 265,000 go to Canada, over 200,000 to Australia, and more than 420,000 to the UK. While the American empire may be in decline, its universities still hold a great allure for the youth of the world for their academic leadership, freedom to explore and create and share, and their inviting and equitable atmosphere.

Want Good Students? Pay Teachers For Them, Says Fraser Institute

CP | Maria Babbage, The Canadian Press | Posted 09.08.2014 | Canada Living

TORONTO - A new study out of the Fraser Institute contends that financial bonuses and other incentives for teachers should be based on student achieve...

How Adult Literacy Is Transforming a Village

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 09.08.2014 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

September 8 is International Literacy Day, marked with events in schools and communities around the world, and highlighted by a United Nations celebration and conference in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Despite the promising gains of the UN's worldwide "Literacy as Freedom" decade that ended in 2012, more than 770 million people over the age of 15 cannot read or write.

The Schools Keeping First Nations Kids From Turning into "Phantoms"

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 09.04.2014 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

In the small First Nations community of Moricetown, in central B.C., teens haunt the convenience stores and gas bars, their lives adrift. Locals call them "phantoms." Cain Michell, then 14, was one of them. His life changed when Moricetown teachers Tom and Lorna Butz came knocking in 2012,

Why Post Secondary Students Must Protect Their Credit Score

Melissa Jarman | Posted 09.03.2014 | Canada
Melissa Jarman

The credit mistakes that students make today can affect them for years to come, so as parents, it is our job to ensure we teach them about responsible credit use. Our kids often look to us for financial advice and guidance but many parents don't fully understand how to build and maintain a good credit score either.

Educators Need to Embrace Change

Malkin Dare | Posted 09.02.2014 | Canada Living
Malkin Dare

For many years there was no educational Louis Pasteur for reformers to rally round, and so educators have been able to cling to their unfortunate philosophies. This is no longer the case. Unfortunately, many education leaders are ignoring these new findings. Why is that?

Probiotics May Help Children Become Better Students

Jason Tetro | Posted 09.02.2014 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

The benefit of probiotic bacteria on the brain could eventually lead to more specialized probiotics designed specifically to help improve learning and memory. While these products may be years away, parents can take advantage of what has already been learned to help their children today.

Dear Parents, Teachers Are Anxious About the End of Summer Too

Lori Gard | Posted 08.31.2014 | Canada Living
Lori Gard

When you place your precious loved one on the bus in the morning or drop them off at our classroom doors, we want you to know, parents: we do not take this responsibility we've been given lightly. And might I add, when those dear ones are returned to you again, when those precious children arrive home at the end of the day, we won't stop caring.

Women With Multiple Chronic Conditions Are Screened Less Often for Breast Cancer

University of Toronto News | Posted 08.28.2014 | Canada Living
University of Toronto News

Women with severe disabilities and multiple chronic conditions are screened for breast cancer less often than women with no disabilities or no chronic conditions, a new study has found.