Canada Environment

More Ice Doesn't Mean Water Levels Have Stopped Declining

David Sweetnam | Posted 04.16.2014 | Canada
David Sweetnam

Low water levels will persist into the foreseeable future and this will mean significant environmental and economic costs for the region. Seasonal variations are natural and healthy. But when the starting point has moved to an all-time low, a one-time increase is not cause for celebration, especially when forecasts still leave the lakes well below average in Michigan-Huron.

Great Bear Rainforest Will Win With Extra Time

Jens Wieting | Posted 04.15.2014 | Canada British Columbia
Jens Wieting

There is another reason why we cannot afford to take much longer to increase conservation and tighten the rules. One major logging company operating in the region is not a member of the Joint Solutions Project. Instead, TimberWest has a long history of opposing increases in conservation and undertaking extremely profit-driven logging operations in the southern-most portion of the Great Bear Rainforest with very little remaining old-growth.

Is Canada Really Tarring Itself?

Tim Moen | Posted 04.08.2014 | Canada Alberta
Tim Moen

In case you missed it the New York Times recently ran an op-ed by Jacques Leslie entitled "Is Canada Tarring Itself?" As a "tar sands" (I grew up usin...

So, The Tarsands Were To Blame..

Mike Hudema | Posted 04.07.2014 | Canada Alberta
Mike Hudema

It makes you wonder how many other voices that complain about tar sands impacts are being ignored? Fort Chipewyan's calls for independent health inquiry, the cancer concerns in Fort Saskatchewan are just two, both recently echoed by the Edmonton Journal's editorial board; the fact that some doctors may not comfortable treating oil-symptom patients is another.

What's Next For B.C. Park Amendment Act?

Andrew Weaver | Posted 04.02.2014 | Canada British Columbia
Andrew Weaver

There are guidelines over assessing what kind of activities are to be allowed in B.C. parks. However, they are not law -- they are regulations, and they can be changed by the ministry without any public consultation, public debate, or public scrutiny. The passing of Bill 4 means that the law protecting our parks has been weakened, while the ministry has increased its power and adopted a "trust us" approach.

Spirit Bears Are Safe Thanks to Youth Leaders

Simon Jackson | Posted 04.01.2014 | Canada Impact
Simon Jackson

The campaign to save the spirit bear is a full-fledged movement, owned not by the Youth Coalition, but by millions around the world. And having done all we can to take the issue this far, it is up to all of us, as individuals, to take on the responsibility of continuing to make sure that the spirit bear isn't just safe, but will forever be wild and free.

Food Packaging Trends That Tread More Lightly on the Planet

Ian Lifshitz | Posted 03.27.2014 | Canada Impact
Ian Lifshitz

As environmentally conscious consumers increasingly demand more sustainable packaging, we are seeing significant innovation in food industry packaging. With that, we see five emerging trends that we expect to continue and grow in coming years.

Why Canada Should Invest in Beer, Not Tar Sands

Mike Hudema | Posted 03.25.2014 | Canada Politics
Mike Hudema

The "beer economy" employs more than 163,000 people. In fact 1 out of every 100 jobs in Canada is in beer. A report out late last year suggests that 44 cents of every dollar spent on beer goes to the government in taxes ($5.8 billion), making buying beer almost a civic duty.

Seems the Fraser Institute Didn't Quite "Get" My Letter to John Kerry

Elizabeth May | Posted 03.24.2014 | Canada Politics
Elizabeth May

The HuffPost blog from the Fraser Institute's Senior Director, Natural Resource Studies, Kenneth Green, set out to make me look uninformed based on my submission to the U.S. State Department on the proposed Keystone pipeline. From his first words, it was pretty clear he didn't grasp the concept of writing a letter.

Elizabeth May's Fact Sheet Is More of an Opinion Sheet

Kenneth P. Green | Posted 03.24.2014 | Canada Politics
Kenneth P. Green

Recently, Green Party leader Elizabeth May orchestrated an open letter to United States Secretary of State John Kerry, urging the U.S. to reject the Keystone XL pipeline. In her note, Ms. May states that she sent Mr. Kerry "4 facts about Keystone XL." Unfortunately, two of Ms. May's facts aren't actually facts, and two of her facts are so lacking in context as to constitute merely factoids.

Caring for Canada's Waters: Understanding Water Health

David R. Miller | Posted 03.21.2014 | Canada Impact
David R. Miller

Despite the best efforts of citizens and watershed groups actively caring for their local waters across the country, we have no consistent way to measure water health. That leaves us in the dark, unprepared to do what's necessary to care for our waters. It leaves us without the information we need to understand the impacts and trade-offs of development decisions, restoration projects and legal reforms.

Top 5 Dangerous Toxins Hidden in Your Home

Dr. John Dempster | Posted 03.20.2014 | Canada Living
Dr. John Dempster

I often mention that it is not about being perfect in avoiding every toxin -- this is an impossible task in today's world. However, it is important to be aware of toxic sources in your living/working space and reduce or eliminate as many as possible. Combining a reduction & detoxification strategy has never been more important than it is today.

Geoengineering Is Not a Solution for Climate Change Anymore

David Suzuki | Posted 03.19.2014 | Canada
David Suzuki

Because nature doesn't always behave the same in a lab, test tube or computer program as it does in the real world, scientists and engineers have come up with ideas that didn't turn out as expected. We're now facing the most serious unintended consequence ever: climate change from burning fossil fuels. Some proposed solutions may also result in unforeseen outcomes.

Why My Next Car Will Be Electric and Yours Should Too

Jessi Cruickshank | Posted 03.17.2014 | Canada Impact
Jessi Cruickshank

I've always been passionate about the environment. In Grade 6, I started an anti-litter campaign in my elementary school called "Clean Up Your Act" -- I was that kid. When I was 11 years old and telling kids to clean up their trash, I never would have believed that I would drive an electric car in my lifetime. But now the technology exists, it works, and it's more popular than ever.

Canada's Cities Are Growing, So Infrastructure Must Grow Too

David Suzuki | Posted 03.12.2014 | Canada
David Suzuki

Despite being a vast land of mountains, forests and ice, Canada is an urban nation. Over 80 per cent of us live in large centres like Montreal, Toronto and Calgary, as well as rapidly growing communities like Regina, Surrey and Markham. This increasing concentration of people in cities is consistent with rapid urbanization over the whole planet.

Why I Work to Keep Smokestacks Away From Schoolyards

Carl Duivenvoorden | Posted 03.10.2014 | Canada Impact
Carl Duivenvoorden

I was raised on a dairy farm in Belledune, a small community on New Brunswick's North Shore. By the time I showed up to school in the fall of 1968, the schoolhouse was bordered by a smelter on one side and a fertilizer plant on the other. I started hearing a little voice inside me saying, "Do something!"

The Ecological Human

J.B. MacKinnon | Posted 03.05.2014 | Canada Living
J.B. MacKinnon

Only this kind of person can inhabit nature deeply enough to change our troubled relationship to nonhuman life, to observe carefully enough the changes we will continue to make, and to truly love the return of the wild as a formidable presence in our lives.

Measuring Progress with GDP Is a Gross Mistake

David Suzuki | Posted 02.26.2014 | Canada Business
David Suzuki

Governments, media and much of the public are preoccupied with the economy. That means demands such as those for recognition of First Nations treaty rights and environmental protection are often seen as impediments to the goal of maintaining economic growth. The gross domestic product has become a sacred indicator of well-being. Ask corporate CEOs and politicians how they did last year and they'll refer to the rise or fall of the GDP. It's a strange way to measure either economic or social well-being. Whatever we come up with, it has to be better than GDP with its absurd emphasis on endless growth on a finite planet.

Where Have All the Monarchs Gone?

The Nature Conservancy of Canada | Posted 03.01.2014 | Canada
The Nature Conservancy of Canada

When I was a young girl, seeing monarchs flit around was as common as hearing the songs of the meadowlarks and the chipping of ground squirrels. I was...

Top 15 Climate-Inspired Pick-Up Lines Just in Time for Valentine's Day

Mike Hudema | Posted 04.15.2014 | Canada Impact
Mike Hudema

Yesterday the creative folks at the Canadian Youth Climate Coalition launched a very innovative twitter campaign to help raise funds for Power Shift - a youth led convergence on climate change. Check out some of the #climatepickuplines hilarity.

Tar Sands Communities Flee Homes to Escape Emissions, Panel Told

Mike Hudema | Posted 04.14.2014 | Canada Alberta
Mike Hudema

I can't imagine how it would feel after I've seen my cattle die, my daughter almost fall down the stairs because of chronic headaches and dizziness, and my family get sick to the point we had to leave our farm and move into our parents basement. And then to be told that it's not the constant tar sands emissions that are the problem, but my attitude to the oil and gas industry.

'10 Reasons Neil Young Is Right About The Tar Sands'

Mike Hudema | Posted 03.18.2014 | Canada Alberta
Mike Hudema

To say that rock legend Neil Young has been making waves on his ACFN 'Honour the Treaties' tour would be an understatement. His comments about the horrors of the tar sands have made front-page headlines, set social media ablaze, and have brought out more than a few attacks mostly from stalwarts of the oil industry.

We Can Disagree Mr. Harper and That's Okay

Kevin Grandia | Posted 03.17.2014 | Canada Politics
Kevin Grandia

Prime Minister Stephen Harper needs to figure out that not everyone is going to agree with him and his government's policies -- and that's okay. Rock legend Neil Young is making his way across Canada this week on a high-profile concert series in support of First Nations who oppose further expansion of oil sands extraction into their lands. Harper, through his spokesperson, responded to Young's concerns with empty talking points, reiterating that the natural resource sector remains a "fundamental part of our country's economy."Okay. Thanks Captain Obvious. Why is it so hard for the Prime Minister to speak with people who disagree with him?

Harper Greeted With More Protests On B.C. Tour

CP | Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press | Posted 03.09.2014 | Canada British Columbia

MILL BAY, - Prime Minister Stephen Harper hiked a historic trail Tuesday with about 50 Scouts from Vancouver Island, but the serenity of his peaceful ...

Climate Change Isn't Just Going to Go Away Overnight

Carl Duivenvoorden | Posted 03.05.2014 | Canada Politics
Carl Duivenvoorden

It's nice to imagine that the great environmental challenges of our time will mystically be solved by outside forces so that we can just keep doing what we are doing to the Earth that sustains us. Alas, that is an impossible hope.