Girls Education

How #DayoftheGirl Can Help Prevent Ebola Outbreaks

John Stackhouse | Posted 12.11.2014 | Canada Impact
John Stackhouse

In Africa, Ebola and women's rights are not unrelated. As Bertha, one of the young women in the book, says: "When you educate a girl, everything changes." Everything. Among the many ugly lessons from the Ebola zone is the cost of poor primary health care, and how it is directly correlated to female literacy. We know better. From Vietnam to Jordan to Ghana, we know that frontline health care improves when women are involved. Better still if they are in charge, as professionally trained workers, and educated mothers with freedom to make health care decisions for their families.

Annoyed at Your Homework? A Girl in Kenya Will Change Your Mind

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 11.29.2014 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

When the students at Kisaruni All-Girls Secondary School in rural Kenya had the opportunity to set their school hours, they pushed the limits. The girls begin their studies each morning at 4:45 a.m. and end at 10 p.m., with classroom instruction from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The grumbling resentment toward schoolwork that typifies the North American high-school experience seemed, well, positively lame, compared to the Kenyan girls' fierce dedication to learning.

Africa's Booming Population Needs Agricultural Innovation

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 10.22.2014 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

Africa's 600 million hectares of uncultivated land -- more than half the global total -- adds up to a recipe for a better food future. Agricultural innovation, education, and the resulting empowerment of women and girls promises to make the coming population boom a turning point toward truly sustainable development.

Make Japan a Nation Where Women and Men Shine

G(irls)20 | Posted 09.30.2014 | Canada
G(irls)20

It is widely acknowledged that Japan needs more females in business to make up for a shrinking workforce and to boost economic growth and opportunity. With this admirable goal in mind, we must work to make Japan a nation where every individual, male and female, has equal opportunities to realize their full social, economic and political potential. As a Japanese youth, I am not afraid to break from traditional practices and defy what is expected of me. I am ready to pursue my own dream to become a fearsome business leader and 2014 G(irls)20 Delegate representing Japan.

It's Time to Connect the Dots on Gender-Based Violence

Rosemary McCarney | Posted 08.27.2014 | Canada Living
Rosemary McCarney

When the headlines fade, the daily, persistent, and pervasive violence against girls and women around the world will continue unabated and generally unreported. And it will persist until people and their governments start connecting the dots between these headline-making atrocities and the everyday, out of the headlines, violence targeted at girls and women on public streets, in the household, in the workplace, and in and around schools and why these incidents happen.

How You (And Hollywood) Can Further Girls' Education Around The World

CP | Sandy Cohen, The Associated Press | Posted 08.20.2014 | Canada Impact

LOS ANGELES, Calif. - Dozens of actors and athletes are joining a U.S. government effort to support girls' education worldwide.Jennifer Garner, Susan ...

Nigerian Kidnapping Signals a Larger, Global Problem That We Can Change

Rosemary McCarney | Posted 07.21.2014 | Canada Impact
Rosemary McCarney

The latest headlines about the kidnapping of some 300 Nigerian girls are part of an even larger and generally unreported story -- the widespread, worldwide tolerance of violence against women and girls. While the kidnapping is clearly an act perpetrated by an extremist group, it is also much more than that.

Think Globally for International Women's Day

Debbie Wolfe | Posted 05.07.2014 | Canada
Debbie Wolfe

On International Women's Day, the global picture is filled with girls for whom the schoolhouse door is closed. It's not just a matter of having one's freedom of choice limited, as it was with pioneer schoolgirls here in Canada. It's even bleaker than that.

A Loud Message from Girls for Malala -- and the World

Rosemary McCarney | Posted 05.05.2014 | Canada Impact
Rosemary McCarney

Over the past nine months, I learned first hand the truth of one well-worn cliché -- a picture really is worth a thousand words. In this case, it's a select group of photos of young girls from around the world that forcefully convey their struggles for basic human rights.

How October 11 Became Day of the Girl

Aaron Winston Smith | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Impact
Aaron Winston Smith

It's an alarming statistic that 66-million girls are out of school globally, and that there are 33-million fewer girls than boys in primary school. Back in September 2009, Plan Canada's Because I am a Girl initiative launched an online petition advocating for a Day of the Girl.

Girl Rising: Education Is an Ally to Girls Around the World

Justin Reeves | Posted 11.11.2013 | Canada Impact
Justin Reeves

Girl Rising tells of girls facing arranged marriages, child slavery, and other injustices we only read about here in Canada. But the girls in the film all have a common ally: education. By getting an education, they're all able to change the course of their lives, breaking barriers and creating change.

Why a Woman's Education Will Determine her Economic Future

G(irls)20 | Posted 11.01.2013 | Canada Impact
G(irls)20

2013-06-12-blog_girls_20_summit_v01A.png We need to equip women with the particular skills needed to create vibrant, diverse, adaptive economic ventures. Women should be provided with accessible, subsidized business and management education that enables them to start, run, and manage effective businesses.

Investing in Girls Is Good for Boys

Rosemary McCarney | Posted 11.24.2011 | Canada Living
Rosemary McCarney

The word is spreading: investing in girls is the catalyst poor countries need to break the cycle of poverty. But what about the boys? In our focus on girls, are we leaving the boys behind -- making them the new disadvantaged group?