Glass Ceiling

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Business Is No Longer a Man's World

Back in the 1970s, there were few positive female role models as business leaders. We live in an information age, we need leaders who are great communicators, understand the need for team work, and can bring a nurturing spirit to the workplace. Women are naturally effective in these areas. Although women have not yet achieved quite the salary equity of men, nor rule the majority of Fortune 500 companies, this is all changing as women step into their natural leadership capacities. Good leadership does not require a particular gender, but an individual who has developed good character, integrity and wisdom.
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When Women Take Risks in Business

Even though not every risk delivers the results we desire, one thing is certain: the biggest risk for a woman is to hold back and try to be one of the crowd. If we hide what makes us special and unique, our companies will suffer and so will our careers. It is a lost opportunity.
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8 Ways To Kick Butt At Work

Billie Jean King, the tennis legend who won the Battle Of The Sexes to prove women could, in fact, play the sport as well as men, and Ursula Burns, the charismatic CEO of Xerox, are two ladies every w...
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More Women Should Be on Top

One of the greatest economic challenges facing women in the United States is the lack of women in top management positions. Only 4.2 per cent of Fortune 500 CEOs are women. We need more women leading our workspaces, our corporations, and our country.
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<i>Women, Work & the Art of Savoir Faire</i>: A Breezy Business Read

The book includes the recommendation that professional women dress "smexy" (the author's word for smart and sexy). Most of the powerful women I know look professional, but don't invest a lot of time into looking fabulously sexy. They're too busy kicking ass and getting shit done. I'm willing to overlook our disagreement on this issue, however, because other parts of the book are good.