Influenza

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The Flu May Be Trickier Than We Thought

It's the middle of flu season and as expected, the virus is making its way through Canada. Thousands of people are struggling with the coughs, fever, and fatigue and looking for ways to deal with the weeks of suffering. Recently, a group of American researchers have shown a new means by which flu can survive and spread.
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Here's Why People Avoid The Flu Vaccine

The rate of vaccine acquisition has remained relatively stable over the years suggesting the majority of Canadians are not raising their sleeves. While there is little doubt the vaccine is an excellent means to prevent infection, this message appears to be diluted by a number of other factors. For those responsible for ensuring the safety of Canadians the low turnout requires a more in-depth analysis to find a solution.
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How Effective Is The Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine?

Getting the flu vaccine is the best way to keep you and your family healthy during flu season. This can be done in one of two ways: by getting the flu shot, or by getting the nasal spray flu vaccine. However, deciding which method to use has recently become more confusing. After it was announced that the nasal spray would not be used in the U.S. this year, many have wondered whether the nasal spray flu vaccine is still effective.
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New Year, New Flu, New Troubles

It's that time of year again: flu season. Once again, the influenza virus has showed up in Canada threatening up to 20 per cent of the population. For the vaccine to be effective, it has to perfectly mimic the viruses in nature. This is actually harder than one might think as influenza is the master of evolutionary disguise.

You May Be Better Off Without a Flu Shot

Flu shots have raised similar alarms in young children. In the 2011 flu season, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirmed 42 cases of seizures, 36 of them involving infants and 10 of them deemed "serious," after vaccination with Fluzone, a vaccine made by Sanofi-Pasteur.
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Don't Believe These 'Tips' For Avoiding the Flu

Finally we have Wylde's first suggestion, the one that made me believe it is just sitting in his kitchen making this up out of thin air. There is absolutely no evidence adding petroleum jelly to the inside of your nose will increase your infection barrier and prevent infection. Your nose is much larger than just the nostril you can stick the swab into, so there will be plenty of area left to harbour virus.
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SHORTAGE

Medical clinics and pharmacies in the Lower Mainland and on Vancouver Island are running out of influenza vaccines, while others are struggling to keep up with demand. The clinic at Lonsdale and 18th...