Life-Expectancy

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New Prescription Drugs Are Worth the Cost

We cannot deny the fact that the costs of prescription drugs have been increasing at a considerable rate over the last few decades. While total healthcare spending per capita has almost tripled during this period, per capita expenditures on prescription drugs have increased six-fold. But should this trend be a source of concern?
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The Shocking Truth? More Health Care Doesn't Mean Better Health

How much a society spends on health care has not been found to be directly related to any health outcome tested. A society that spends so much on health care that it cannot or will not spend adequately on other health-enhancing activities may actually be reducing the health of its population. If a country wants to see significant improvements in its population health, the best public policy is to eliminate poverty.
PA

More Than 7 Billion Served: The Case for Optimism

There are more people in the world, yet we are collectively more free and prosperous. Global cooling and the viral Armageddon never happened. Communism ended, liberating Eastern Europe, all without a shot fired. Even the average IQ is -- amazingly -- trending up. The data is good. Really good.

Canadians Living A Little Longer

A baby born in 2006 in Canada can expect to live to an average age of 80.9, Statistics Canada says. That's up 0.2 years from 2005-07, the agency said Tuesday in its report on rising life expectancy,...
PA

Canada's Biggest U.S. Import: Fat?

Canadians still aren't quite American in their girth, but our fondness for Timbits takes a toll. If Canada wants to avoid American-style obesity rates, we need to take some thoughtful steps. First, we need to emphasize physical education in our schools.
AP

Biden, China and Our Shared Only-Child Dilemma

China's 4:2:1 problem is ours, too, just with a different name: A glut of people are growing old and there are fewer of us to pay for their care, while also having to save for our own retirement. At the personal level, there are more of us without siblings shouldering the costs of care for aging parents.
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Freedom 55? Forget About It

Forget about freedom 55 — most of us will be lucky if we’re able to retire by 65 or 70. Once we get there, we’ll likely have lower benefits after paying higher premium