PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

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Is The Gig Economy Hurting Public Transit?

To some, it's the shared economy disrupting the old business models. To others, it's the gig economy that denies workers full-time hours and a living wage. Regardless of its name, the new economy is disrupting more than the established business norms. It is forcing grown-ups to live with their parents and is likely causing the decline in public transit ridership.
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Is Public Transit Actually Too Cheap?

Yes, that's right, cheap. To cross the 26-kilometer stretch of Toronto's core by public transit costs a meager $3. Head north on Yonge Street, the world's longest road, and a single subway fare up the 30 kilometre stretch to the city's northern reaches will still cost $3. To hop just one stop also costs $3. Twenty-five years ago the cost of the same journey by transit would be $1.20, a 150 per cent increase.
CP

These Politicians' Random Maps Are Not Transit Plans

For a sophisticated city like Toronto, it is embarrassing to see the leading candidates passing random lines drawn on a map for transit plans. These so-called plans lack research, engineering cost and ridership estimates, and transit revenue forecasts. At best, one could call these plans the transit dreams of mayoral hopefuls. However, given the underestimated costs and overestimated benefits of these proposals, it is likely that the politicians' dream would become taxpayers' nightmare.
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Canada's Car Culture Isn't as Bad as the Danish Tourists Think

This week, two European tourists complained about the Canadian car culture after a brief stint in the 10 million square kilometer nation of over 35-million people. The British and Danish complainers now reside in Aarhus, Denmark. While I support criticizing a country, it is also good to have the facts in order. To that end, here are some stats Chabowski should have taken into account before making rush judgments on Canadian society.
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China Is On Speed. What's Canada On?

China has pursued this technology leadership goal for 20 years. Back in the 1990s, it began importing technology from Germany, the Siemens Velaro model; from France, the Alstom New Pendolinos. And, guess what? The Zefiro 250 type, made right here in Canada by Bombardier. In 2008, investment in high-speed rail projects shot up to $88 billion with plans to open 42 new lines.