Sikhism

I Don't Want to Be the Only Minority at the Table. I Want to Add More Chairs

Jasmeet Sidhu | Posted 04.01.2015 | Canada Living
Jasmeet Sidhu

I remember so distinctly staring around at the room of Toronto Star editors and the people around me, including my own fellow interns, and I remember the exact moment of realizing that everyone in that room, except me, was white. I often believe its all too easy when you exist as a member of the "other," like a minority community like ours, for someone to cling to the idea of being the "first one," the "only one" and achieve what they can in the world for themselves and then go home with the pride of that recognition and nothing else. What if instead of believing there are limited seats to the table, we all chose to add more chairs?

A Conversation With YouTube Stars Humble the Poet and Superwoman #Leh

Raji Aujla | Posted 09.30.2014 | Canada Living
Raji Aujla

YouTube stars Lilly Singh and Kanwer Singh, better known as Superwoman and Humble the Poet sit down with Raji Aujla to talk about the process of creating their viral music video, #Leh.

Celebrating Vaisakhi In Vancouver

The Huffington Post B.C. | Posted 04.21.2014 | Canada British Columbia

Tens of thousands of people, including politicians Justin Trudeau and Christy Clark, took in the annual Vaisakhi parade in Vancouver Saturday. Vais...

Alberta Allows Sikhs To Wear Religious Knives In Court

CP | John Cotter, The Canadian Press | Posted 04.10.2013 | Canada Alberta

EDMONTON - The Alberta government has come up with a policy that allows Sikhs to wear a ceremonial religious dagger called a kirpan in provincial cour...

Why This Feminist Atheist Still Celebrates Diwali

Supriya Dwivedi | Posted 01.13.2013 | Canada Living
Supriya Dwivedi

I began to question religion at a very young age. I suppose my early interest in science and constant observations of the mistreatment of women in Hinduism and Indian culture played a large role. Thankfully, I was raised by an intelligent, progressive woman who welcomed and encouraged my critical thought. Even as I started to question religion in general and mine in particular, I continued to celebrate Diwali. It seems to be the one day of the year where the whole country puts aside its trivial differences, lights up, and celebrates together as one. That's a holiday that even the most crotchety atheists, this one included, can celebrate.