WORLD SERIES

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We're All Blue Jays Fans When We Gather Around the Same TV

I remember in the fall of 1993, when the Blue Jays last won the World Series, and how the celebrations in the streets went on all night long. Even those of us who weren't die-hard baseball fans were caught up in the thrill of our home team winning the series. We were all proud Torontonians, and we felt the communal aspect of the win. When we watch sports on TV, we can't help but have strong emotions.
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Do You Know Your Baseball Good Luck Charms?

Baseball is a superstitious sport. Good luck charms and curses are widely believed to help or hinder a team's ability to claim the coveted World Series trophy and rings. To celebrate the start of the World Series this week, here's a roundup of some good luck charms to boost your baseball banter.

Paying A Queen's Ransom For Hallowed Hosiery

At a live auction in New York City on Saturday night, the bloodied sock worn by Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling in Game Two of the 2004 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals was sold for (wait for it) $92,613. For a sock. Soaked in old sweat. Soiled with blood.
AP

The MLB Is the Biggest Cheater in Baseball

Let's stop pretending that we're so offended by our All-Stars cheating over an entire career and over an entire life. Steroids are to sports what sex is to the White House. The MLB is the biggest cheater in baseball. They're just better at hiding the syringes.
Steven Meisel

The Most Exciting Part About the World Series? Kate Upton

Not to suggest that the world revolves around Kate Upton, but given all the hoopla and hype afforded in recent days to the star-spangled awesome actress and supermodel, an observer could easily conclude that the World Series most surely revolves around her. But as one writer put it: "an entire city breathlessly awaits an answer to what fans really want to know. Is [Detroit Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander] really dating supermodel Kate Upton?"
AP

Why Everyone Loves the Oakland A's

Somewhere, somehow -- in some corner of the baseball universe or the baseball-watching universe -- there is somebody who does not understand why everyone loves the Oakland Athletics. Moneyball is not the reason. It's not their salary or their ongoing rivalry with the concept of capitalism. That's too easy.