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Strategies For Working With Difficult People

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Who is the most difficult person you work with? Does it feel to you like they spend each evening plotting and planning on how to ruin the next day for you? Does it drain your energy just thinking about this person? You're not alone. It seems that every one of us has a 'difficult to deal with' person in our life. They take a lot of energy just to ignore, and many of us wish they would just go away.

If you can identify with this scenario, finish the rest of this sentence: "I would be more effective working with my difficult person if..."

What is your 'if'?

Now go back and look at what you wrote. Is your answer dependant on them doing something to change? Why do you think they would be willing to change to make your life easier? You're right, they won't. So how are we going to be more effective when working with this person?

There are three things that you can change.

1. The System. Perhaps this person is difficult because they are a stick to the rules kind of person and you aren't. It can be very frustrating to you and that this person is so stuck on the system you don't agree with. If you could just change the system it would make your life a lot easier, don't you think? Of course, changing the system is an extremely time intensive proposition with no guarantee of any success.

There are people, like Erin Brockovich for example, who are able to change the system but most people decide that the effort does not equal the payoff. If this is your situation, you may choose to avoid trying to change the system. I'm not saying that it won't work -- I am saying that it will take a lot of your time and efforts before you see any dividends. It may be easier to take another approach with your difficult person.

2. The Other Person. You've probably heard the old cliché, "If you plan on changing your spouse when you get married, it makes for a very interesting first marriage." It's not so easy to change the other person because there is no incentive for them to change. Why should they? What they are doing is currently working just fine, isn't it?

Consider a co-worker that listens to his music at a very loud volume. He likes I that loud, it helps him drown out all the other noise in the office. You despise the type of music he listens to, and it is far too loud for you to concentrate. You've asked your co-worker to turn it down every day for the past three months and it has now escalated into an all-out war between the two of you.

You are trying to get your difficult person to see that his music is too loud and you cannot concentrate. You are trying to change his perspective on the volume. Why should he turn it down? He likes it just the way it is. Trying to change the other person is often like hitting your head against a brick wall; it just doesn't work very well. There is no incentive for the other person to take your perspective.

3. You. Of course, you do have one hundred percent control of what you do. You could try to change your perspective on the situation. Let's assume that your difficult person is Mary, and Mary loves to complain about the company you work for. She says things like, "they don't appreciate us", "I'm doing all the work around here and never get any recognition", and "this is an old boys club and women will never get in senior management positions".

Basic whining and moaning, all the time, day in and day out. At first, you agreed with some of the things she said, and occasionally got pulled into the negativity yourself. After a while, you realized how destructive this was to your attitude and you tried to convince Mary that she was wrong. This, of course, just intensified the situation and the negativity seemed to get worse. You've probably moved into the same 'zone' that many of us do when confronted with Mary, saying "You're right, this is a terrible place to work," hoping that your agreement will make her go away faster.

Did it work? Not really. What Mary wants is attention and acknowledgment. You are giving her both of those things. We need to change what we are doing to get a different result.

"If you keep on doing what you've always done,
you'll keep on getting what you've always got"

You've heard that before, and it is completely true. If we want to change the way Mary is acting, we need to change what we are doing, and not give her what she wants. People are difficult because they are getting something out of the deal. They may be getting attention, agreement or even success because of it (think of aggressive drivers). If we want them to do something different (remember the opening question?) then we need to DO something different.

The next time Mary says "I hate this company", don't argue with her or agree with her, give her what she doesn't want (agreement, attention, etc.) and say something like "I LOVE working here!" Don't worry about if you agree with what you are saying or not, give her something other than what she wants. She wants to complain. She wants to be negative. Don't give her what she wants.

This will work! Sometimes a lot of work too, especially if you happen to be in a negative mood that day and agree with her. Don't give into the temptation. Be 100% consistent in this approach. For two weeks this will be very difficult for you. I promise that if you are consistent and not give Mary what she wants, then she will change her behaviour.

The next time you are asked the question "I would be more effective working with my difficult person if..." the right answer lies within you. You can change what is happening with that person. It takes time, effort, persistence and patience.

The result is worth the effort!

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