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A Letter to My Son About Jian Ghomeshi

11/19/2014 01:32 EST | Updated 01/19/2015 05:59 EST
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This letter was written by my husband and he has agreed to let me share it here. I hope it inspires you as much as it inspires me.

Connor,

You're six years old. You're in grade one. You're sitting at the breakfast table eating Nutella on toast. You're fidgety because you want to play with your Lego before you go to school and I'm making you finish your breakfast and get dressed before you do.

I'm reading a news article about a man named Jian Ghomeshi, a radio host that I admired and who we've listened to together in the car. He has been accused of violently assaulting women he dates.

The article says that many of the women he assaulted didn't speak up for fear that they wouldn't be believed or that they would be blamed or that their careers or personal lives would be ruined.

The article goes on to say that people acquainted with him may have known how he treated women and that one woman who did complain was largely ignored.

I can't help but think of you.

Like every parent I've wondered about your future and what kind of person you will turn out to be. Will you be academic? Artistic? Athletic? What kind of friends will you make? Will you be happy?

Like every parent, I've thought about my role helping you become the person you are to be. I've thought about what I'd tell you about doing your best, about standing up to peer pressure, and about taking responsibility for your actions.

And, as the parent of two boys, I've thought about what I'd talk to you about before you started dating.

One of the first girls I dated had been raped by a past boyfriend. She went to court and wasn't able to prove that he did anything they hadn't consented to, so he wasn't punished. At the time, she lived in a small town and the gossip forced her family to move away. Before her, I don't think I was really that aware of rape or consent. I'm sure that I'd had the "no means no" conversation in health class but until her it didn't really mean that much to me.

After university I worked for a year at a women's sexual assault centre. It was a place where women who'd been assaulted could receive support and counselling. I was the first male who'd ever worked there and I worked on a project that taught teenagers that "no means no" wasn't enough; that consent isn't just about stopping when someone says no, but it's about discussing your boundaries beforehand.

These experiences have been foremost in my mind as I've considered what you and I might talk about regarding dating and sex. I know that I want you to treat girls with respect. That, no matter what, she feels safe in your company and that whatever behaviour you engage in is something you both want.

And for the longest time that, plus a healthy dose of biological information, seemed to be good enough. But not anymore. I see now that it's not enough to hope you don't grow up to be a rapist. My vision for your future needs to be bigger. I want you to grow up to be a boy who stands up when someone makes a demeaning comment about a girl. I want you to be a man who speaks up when you see sexual harassment at work. I want you to be an example of how men are supposed to treat women. That you become part of the solution to violence against women and not sit silently by and be part of the problem.

Love,

Dad

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