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Don't Let the Bad Weather Derail Your Exercise Routine

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miljko via Getty Images
miljko via Getty Images

Too dark, too rainy, too cold -- there are countless obstacles to outdoor exercising in the winter months. It's also a time for easy excuses. But what a shame to see that hard work you've put in all year go to waste because it's less pleasant outside. It shouldn't be this way, it doesn't have to be.

Admittedly, walking or running in foul weather is not everyone's cup of tea. The temptation to remain sedentary is extra persuasive then, but the effects become evident all too soon, especially when you add in the extra food intake that seems unavoidable during the holidays.

So keeping an eye on your fitness routine is even more important. Not only does regular exercise benefit the body all year round but the mind as well and can keep the notorious "winter blues," a.k.a. "Seasonal Affective Disorder" (SAD), at bay.

Scientists at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, in cooperation with colleagues from the Witten/Herdecke University in Witten, Germany, have found that when people move less, their mood also changes, and not for the better.

Worse yet, prolonged lack of physical activity can lead to occurrences of negative emotions, including bouts of depression, according to their study results.

If that is not damaging enough, the researchers also detected connections between insufficient exercise and deficiencies in memory.

It's as simple as observing someone's gait that can tell a lot about whether that person is depressed or cheerful and energetic. Also, in memory tests that required recalling strings of words, participants who felt downbeat remembered predominantly negative adjectives like "boring" or "stupid," in contrast to their counterparts with a more positive outlook who focused on descriptions like "courageous" or "attractive."

The tests confirm what prior research has abundantly shown, namely that the way and the intensity by which we move affects our mental capacity as well.

Obviously, there is a correlation between body and mind when it comes to remembering information, Dr. Johannes Michalak, a professor of psychology at Witten/Herdecke University and lead researcher, concluded in the study report.

Besides the positive effects on the mind, there is also much to be said for the benefits of winter activities for the body.

The best defense against catching a cold or worse is to strengthen the immune system. This can be done by eating a diet full of immune system-boosting foods, getting sufficient amounts of sleep, managing stress and, of course, exercising.

Fresh air is especially helpful, says Achim Achilles, a long distance runner and health and fitness columnist for the German newsmagazine Der Spiegel.

Cold temperatures and precipitation don't have to keep you inside. But there are some caveats, he says, that should be considered. For one, it takes longer for the muscles to warm up. In order to avoid injuries, it is important to stretch and increase intensity gradually. Also staying dry as much as possible by wearing protective gear and getting out of wet clothes quickly is a must. Other than that, there is no reason why anybody should forego their favorite outdoor activities, come rain or shine.

Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.

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