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‘Follow-Up’ Podcast: One-On-One With Gerald Butts

The prime minister’s former principal secretary says he has no regrets.
Gerald Butts sits down with Althia Raj, HuffPost Canada's Ottawa bureau chief and
Gerald Butts sits down with Althia Raj, HuffPost Canada's Ottawa bureau chief and

OTTAWA — Gerald Butts isn't comfortable with talking about himself.

The prime minister's former principal secretary has been keeping a low profile since his March testimony on the SNC-Lavalin affair, a controversy he says took on an "outsized importance" compared to other issues at the time.

In an exclusive interview on HuffPost Canada's "Follow-Up" podcast, Butts sat down with host Althia Raj for an extended discussion about his new relationship with the prime minister's office, SNC-Lavalin, and the unexpected realities of political fame.

Listen now:

Get this episode and more "Follow-Up" on Apple Podcasts or Google Play. New to podcasts? Here's how to get started.

Detailed show notes:

(3:43) Butts explains why he's sitting down for this interview

  • (26:39) "What do you mean by it was difficult on your family?"

  • (16:49) The last conversation Butts had with Jody Wilson-Raybould

  • (27:00) The "most difficult" period for Butts' family after his resignation

  • (32:28) A violation of Marquess of Queensberry rules

  • (45:15) "One of the most surreal things about being involved in politics..."

  • (48:36) Butts share the best piece of advice he's ever got (Spoiler: it's from his aunt, former Canadian senator Sister Peggy Butts)

  • (49:57) The letter to Dalton McGuinty that marked a career turning point

  • (1:04:47) Agreeing to disagree on Liberals' broken promises

  • (1:08:08) "I don't think people appreciate how real the dangers are for people in public life right now" and talking about Michael Wernick

  • (1:18:06) Althia notes how the prime minister seems to be "rudderless"; Butts disagrees

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