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05/09/2019 12:23 EDT | Updated 05/09/2019 14:03 EDT

The Royal Baby Isn't The Only Notable Person Named Archie

Lots of jazz musicians! Plus, Archie Bunker.

Left: Getty Images. Right: AP via The Canadian Press
Canadian jazz drummer Archie Alleyne, left, and Archie Andrews of the Archie comics, right.

We finally know Baby Sussex's name! And nobody, besides apparently Prince George, saw "Archie" coming.

The name is less formal than many people expected, especially when coupled with the fact that the baby wasn't given an official royal title. And it comes as something of surprise, especially given the stranglehold Archie comics have on our culture.

But, there are lots of other notable Archies, both real and imaginary. Many people have suggested that the name could be a nod to Meghan's heritage, given that there are several accomplished African-American musicians, athletes, and intellectuals named Archie.

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The Duke and Duchess of Sussex pose with baby Archie on Wednesday.

Harry and Meghan's wedding last spring was imbued with lots of black American traditions, including a sermon by a Bishop from Chicago, the Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, who quoted Martin Luther King Jr., and a black gospel choir singing "Stand By Me."

Since we don't know the name's inspiration with any certainty, though, we started thinking about all the other people out there who share a name with the royal baby. Join us, won't you, on a journey through the wide range of Archies — both real and fictional — who permeate our cultural landscape.

Archie Alleyne, jazz drummer

Jeff Goode via Getty Images
Archie, left, photographed in Toronto.

Alleyne, who died in 2015 at the age of 82, was a Canadian drummer who had played with jazz royalty like Billie Holiday and Coleman Hawkins. He pushed for jazz to be included in more Canadian musical institutions, calling out the exclusion of the genre from the Canada Council for the Arts as discriminatory. He set up scholarship programs for young musicians, and was named to the Order of Canada in 2012.

Archie Alexander, engineer

In 1912, Alexander became the first black student to graduate from the University of Iowa's engineering program. He went on to earn a whole host of other degrees internationally, and worked successfully as an engineer at a time when he must have faced a huge amount of discrimination.

Archie Andrews, comic book character

Definitely one of the least impressive Archies on this list, but also one of the most recognizable, sadly. This Archie has red hair, is chronically indecisive, and drives a jalopy. Or, if you prefer the dark sexy TV version, he has ripped abs, and is trying to help people leave a cult, or something (Truth be told, it's gotten too dark/sexy/confusing as to be coherent)?

(In case you were wondering, yes, Archie Comics did weigh in on the name.)

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Archie comics are exceedingly popular.

Archie Arnett, fellow celebrity child

Amy Poehler and Will Arnett named their first son Archie ten years ago. He doesn't appear to be a ginger, although his younger brother, who is not named Archie, does in fact have red hair.

Archie Bell, musician

Also a black musician, he was the lead singer of Archie Bell and The Drells, an R&B group that rose to prominence in the Motown era.

Archie Bunker, fictional curmudgeonly bigot

Archie was the socially reactionary patriarch of the Bunker family in the '70s sitcom "All in the Family." The show's creator, Norman Lear, has said that he intended the character to be an exploration of of someone someone who had both positive and negative traits, and that he didn't mean for him to be a straight-up villain. But he's a character you're supposed to disagree with, Lear explained.

"The lesson is, if you think this way, change," said Carroll O'Connor, the actor who played Bunker, in an interview with Ebony Magazine. "That's the lesson. But we don't come out and say so, because that is a very bad way to teach."

The "Archie Bunker" type — someone resistant to change and unrepentantly bigoted — comes up frequently enough when discussing certain segments of the American electorate.

Archie "Cary" Grant

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Believe it or not, Cary Grant's real name is Archibald.

Okay, maybe this is cheating, a little bit, but did you know that Cary Grant's real first name is Archibald?! Imagine if Archie Grant had starred in "North by Northwest" or "His Girl Friday"?

Archie Mafeje, South African intellectual

As a black man born in South Africa in the 1930s, Mafeje was an outspoken critic of apartheid who was arrested in his youth for attending protests. He was named senior lecturer at the University of Cape Town, but his appointment was quickly reversed due to apartheid law. He left for England in the 1960s, and continued to fight against apartheid as he moved around the world.

Mafeje spent 30 years exiled from his native country before returning to South Africa in the 1990s. He died in 2007, but was given a posthumous doctorate from the University of Cape Town in 2008.

Archie Panjabi, actress

Kalinda on "The Good Wife!" The older sister in "Bend It Like Beckham!" You've definitely seen this British character actress in something.

More from HuffPost Canada:

Archie Shepp, musician

Another acclaimed musician named Archie! Shepp is a saxophonist who was a pioneer of the free jazz movement. He's also written about jazz, and its connection to black liberation.

Now in his 80s, he plays what he calls the "art song" — essentially, spiritual jazz and civil rights anthems, as The Guardian describes his work. In a review of his live show last fall, the paper said his sax solos are "as garrulous as ever."

Kristy Sparow via Getty Images
Saxophone player Archie Shepp performing at Grande Halle de La Villette in Paris on September 7, 2010.

"There's the sweet, leisurely, breathy tone at the lower end of the tenor sax that recalls Ben Webster," the reviewer said.

Archie Williams, athlete and pilot

Another Archie — not an Archibald — Williams was a black American runner who was at the 1936 Olympics in Nazi-occupied Berlin when Jesse Owens won. Williams himself also won a gold medal, in the 400-metre run.

After his Olympic glory, he got a degree in mechanical engineering and went on to become a pilot.

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