The tablet computer has no future, BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins told Bloomberg in an interview.

In five years I don’t think there’ll be a reason to have a tablet anymore,” Heins said in an interview in Los Angeles Monday. “Maybe a big screen in your workspace, but not a tablet as such. Tablets themselves are not a good business model.”

His comments are the strongest indication yet that BlackBerry may be planning to abandon its tablet computer line, less than two years after the company's PlayBook debuted to less than stellar reviews.

BlackBerry took a $485 million write-down in 2011 after the PlayBook was panned by critics for lacking a built-in email feature, among other issues.

“In five years, I see BlackBerry to be the absolute leader in mobile computing -- that’s what we’re aiming for,” Heins told Bloomberg. “I want to gain as much market share as I can, but not by being a copycat.”

Heins has raised some eyebrows recently with comments about the state of the mobile computing business, particularly with a recent comment in which he suggested the iPhone has become out-of-date.

"The rate of innovation is so high in our industry that if you don’t innovate at that speed you can be replaced pretty quickly. The user interface on the iPhone — with all due respect for what this invention was all about — is now five years old,” he said, in comments that had some observers accusing BlackBerry of being the pot that called the kettle black.

Heins’ comments come amid good news for BlackBerry on another front: Its new Q10 model, slated for release in Canada on Wednesday, has reportedly been selling like hotcakes in the U.K., where it debuted first.

The Q10, which features BlackBerry’s signature physical keyboard, reportedly sold out at department store chain Selfridges in record time, business blog Seeking Alpha reports.

Heins said earlier he expects sales of the Q10 be in the "tens of millions."

BlackBerry has been grappling with contradictory and often alarmist reports about the state of its business. The Waterloo, Ont.-based company asked the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and Ontario Securities Commission to investigate an analyst’s report that the BlackBerry Z10, the touch-screen model that debuted in January, is experiencing an unusually high rate of returns.

BlackBerry says the report is “false.”

In yet another harbinger of bad news for BlackBerry, an analyst at Wedge Partners predicted last week that production of the Z10 is being scaled back.

But Jefferies Group analyst Peter Misek said in a client note he sees return rates at normal levels.

“Z10 sales in Canada, the U.S. and U.K. remain steady with no inventory or return issues,” he wrote.

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  • BlackBerry's CEO Thorsten Heins is seen on a screen in a live broadcast from a launch event in New York as he holds the new smartphones, Q10 and Z10, during a launch event in London, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013. The first in a new generation of long-awaited BlackBerrys will go on sale in the next week in Canada and the United Kingdom, but won't be released in the U.S. until March.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

  • Thorsten Heins

    Thorsten Heins, CEO of Research in Motion, introduces the BlackBerry 10, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013 in New York. The maker of the BlackBerry smartphone is promising a speedy browser, a superb typing experience and the ability to keep work and personal identities separate on the same phone, the fruit of a crucial, long-overdue makeover for the Canadian company. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Thorsten Heins

    Thorsten Heins, CEO of Research in Motion, announces that the company will now be known as BlackBerry, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013 in New York. The new BlackBerry smartphone is promising a speedy browser, a superb typing experience and the ability to keep work and personal identities separate on the same phone, the fruit of a crucial, long-overdue makeover for the Canadian company. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Thorsten Heins, Alecia Keys

    Thorsten Heins, CEO of Research in Motion, kisses Alicia Keys as he introduces her as the Global Creative director of BlackBerry, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013 in New York. The maker of the BlackBerry smartphone is promising a speedy browser, a superb typing experience and the ability to keep work and personal identities separate on the same phone, the fruit of a crucial, long-overdue makeover for the Canadian company. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Thorsten Heins, Alecia Keys

    Thorsten Heins, CEO of Research in Motion, kisses Alicia Keys as he introduces her as the Global Creative director of Blackberry, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013 in New York. The maker of the BlackBerry smartphone is promising a speedy browser, a superb typing experience and the ability to keep work and personal identities separate on the same phone, the fruit of a crucial, long-overdue makeover for the Canadian company. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • A man holds the new touchscreen BlackBerry Z10 smartphone, during a launch event for the new phone in London, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

  • Thorsten Heins, Alecia Keys

    Thorsten Heins, CEO of Research in Motion, introduces Alicia Keys as the Global Creative director of BlackBerry, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013 in New York. The maker of the BlackBerry smartphone is promising a speedy browser, a superb typing experience and the ability to keep work and personal identities separate on the same phone, the fruit of a crucial, long-overdue makeover for the Canadian company. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • A man holds the new touchscreen BlackBerry Z10 smartphone, during a launch event for the new phone in London, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

  • A woman uses a new touchscreen BlackBerry Z10 smartphone, put on display during a launch event for the new phone in London, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

  • Journalists check the new BlackBerry Z10 smartphones, during a launch in London, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013. The first in a new generation of long-awaited BlackBerrys will go on sale in the next week in Canada and the United Kingdom, but won't be released in the U.S. until March. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

  • The BlackBerry Z10 is displayed, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013 in New York. The maker of the BlackBerry smartphone is promising a speedy browser, a superb typing experience and the ability to keep work and personal identities separate on the same phone, the fruit of a crucial, long-overdue makeover for the Canadian company. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Thorsten Heins, CEO of Research in Motion, which is changing its name to BlackBerry, is seen in Toronto on a video link from New York as he introduces the BlackBerry 10, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013. The maker of the BlackBerry smartphone is promising a speedy browser, a superb typing experience and the ability to keep work and personal identities separate on the same phone, the fruit of a crucial, long-overdue makeover for the company. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • BlackBerry's CEO Thorsten Heins is seen on a screen on a live broadcast from a launch event in New York of the new smartphones of the company, during a launch event in London, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013. The first in a new generation of long-awaited BlackBerrys will go on sale in the next week in Canada and the United Kingdom, but won't be released in the U.S. until March.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

  • Sam Shperling

    Sam Shperling with Gameloft holds the new Blackberry 10 while playing his company's game, Nova, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013 in New York. The maker of the BlackBerry smartphone is promising a speedy browser, a superb typing experience and the ability to keep work and personal identities separate on the same phone, the fruit of a crucial, long-overdue makeover for the Canadian company. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • BlackBerry's employees prepare the launch event for the company's new smartphones in London, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013. The first in a new generation of long-awaited BlackBerrys will go on sale in the next week in Canada and the United Kingdom, but won't be released in the U.S. until March.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

  • Members of the press watch as BlackBerry's CEO Thorsten Heins, unseen, presents a live broadcast from New York on the new smartphones of the company, during a launch event in London, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013. The first in a new generation of long-awaited BlackBerrys will go on sale in the next week in Canada and the United Kingdom, but won't be released in the U.S. until March.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

  • BlackBerry's CEO Thorsten Heins is seen on a screen in a live broadcast from a launch event in New York as he holds the new smartphones of the company, during a launch event in London, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013. The first in a new generation of long-awaited BlackBerrys will go on sale in the next week in Canada and the United Kingdom, but won't be released in the U.S. until March.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

  • BlackBerry's CEO Thorsten Heins is seen on a screen in a live broadcast from a launch event in New York of the new smartphones of the company, during a launch event in London, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013. The first in a new generation of long-awaited BlackBerrys will go on sale in the next week in Canada and the United Kingdom, but won't be released in the U.S. until March.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)