PARENTS

Study Finds Moms Work Nearly 100 Hours Per Week

They work around the clock, literally.

07/28/2017 11:03 EDT | Updated 07/28/2017 11:03 EDT
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We all know being a mother is a full-time job, but a new study just proved how much that's true.

According to research commissioned by Welch's, moms who juggle kids with paid jobs end up working 98 hours per week! To put that in perspective, Parents.com notes that there are only 168 hours in a week, which means moms are literally working around the clock. (Information on dads was not included in the survey.)

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The study looked at 2,000 U.S. moms with children aged 5 to 12 and found that they were working 14-hour days. On average, these working mamas clocked in at 6:23 a.m. and ended their motherly duties at 8:31 p.m.

As a result of busy daily routines, moms rely heavily on a specific lifesavers. Wet wipes, drive-thru meals, grandparents (who we assume help out) and Netflix ranked the highest among the mothers in the study, as well as having a reliable babysitter and wine.

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"The results of the survey highlight just how demanding the role of mom can be and the non-stop barrage of tasks it consists of," said Casey Lewis, Welch's Health & Nutrition Lead, according to Yahoo News. "Busy moms may identify with the list of 'lifesavers,' which highlights not just a rigorous workload but a constant requirement to feed and fuel the family, week in and week out."

Four in 10 moms say their lives feel like a 'never-ending series of tasks.'

So what are they giving up? According to the survey, it's anything from having hobbies to seeing friends who aren't associated with their kids to going to the bathroom alone (who knew that would ever feel like a luxury?).

Between taking care of the kids, working a full-time job and managing household chores, moms are only left with one hour and seven minutes of "me" time each day.

This time alone is crucial for mothers because it's when they get to finally recharge. According to Psychology Today, having "me" time not only helps you unwind, but also reboots your brain and can improve your relationships with others by helping you gain a better understanding of yourself.

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"Me" time also allows moms to practice self-care, which is so important when four in 10 moms say their lives feel like a "never-ending series of tasks."

To avoid burnout, there are simple things moms can do for themselves, such as reading, going for a walk or keeping a journal.

With so little time in the day spent on themselves, moms really might be the most selfless people in the world.

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